A Japanese girl I know thought that women were pregnant for 10 months. Her Taiwanese husband confirmed that that number is what some Asians use. Has anyone ever heard this before?
Two Japanese girls I work with thought ten months as well, one claiming that "10 months, 10 days" is some sort of expression for the gestation period. One coworker worked for a GBYN and knew that Americans used 9 months. She explained the title of the move "Nine Months" to the other girl who gave an "ahhh," as if finally understanding the title of the movie.
I suppose the Japanese simply measure from the last period instead of the missed period. But that doesn't seem to explain 10 months. Or they are thinking a pregnant women passes through 10 months, counting the first.
But the Japanese dinner guest did believe that a women was "scientifically" pregnant for 10 months. Not so.
Matt
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A Japanese girl I know thought that women were pregnant for 10 months. Her Taiwanese husband confirmed that that number ... the first. But the Japanese dinner guest did believe that a women was "scientifically" pregnant for 10 months. Not so.

Different sorts of months in use here, besides the different starting point...convention around here says nine months on the calendar; if a baby is born on the fourth of July, you count backwards and estimate that conception occurred around the fourth of the preceding September...the Asian system may think in terms of ten times the length of the menstrual month..r
A Japanese girl I know thought that women were pregnant for 10 months. Her Taiwanese husband confirmed that that number is what some Asians use. Has anyone ever heard this before?

No but I've heard of "eight days a week".
Two Japanese girls I work with thought ten months as well, one claiming that "10 months, 10 days" is some ... the first. But the Japanese dinner guest did believe that a women was "scientifically" pregnant for 10 months. Not so.

It's like the Romans used to do.
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A Japanese girl I know thought that women were pregnant for 10 months. Her Taiwanese husband confirmed that that number ... the first. But the Japanese dinner guest did believe that a women was "scientifically" pregnant for 10 months. Not so.

"Q. Why do Japanese people say that women deliver their babies in the TENTH month?
"A. No, Japanese babies don't take longer to mature. Japanese do not count calendar months, but instead think in terms of lunar months of exactly
28 days. Those few days at the end of each of the 9 months count togetherfor one extra month, hence ten months. (pregnancy is 40 weeks = 10 * 4 weeks = 10 months)."
http://www3.tky.3web.ne.jp/~edjacob/saq.html
(etc.)
Adrian
A Japanese girl I know thought that women were pregnant for 10 months. Her Taiwanese husband confirmed that that number ... first. But the Japanese dinner guest did believe that a women was "scientifically" pregnant for 10 months. Not so. Matt

Are they still considered 1 year old at birth? I believe they used to be in Japan (and Taiwan).
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Are they still considered 1 year old at birth? I believe they used to be in Japan (and Taiwan).

This is a misconception. Orientals are not considered to be one year old at birth; age =one= indicates that this is their first calendar year of life. After the next Chinese New Year, they are in their second calendar year of life. It's not giving elapsed time since birth, as our system does.

Steve
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Are they still considered 1 year old at birth? I believe they used to be in Japan (and Taiwan).

Also Italy, if my great-grandmother is any guide.

Steny '08!
A Japanese girl I know thought that women were pregnant for 10 months. Her Taiwanese husband confirmed that that number ... the title of the movie. I suppose the Japanese simply measure from the last period instead of the missed period.

Sorry, I don't think anybody counts from "the missed period" how can you start counting from a non-event? Nor do they count from conception, which usually nobody is sure of either.
Here's an Australian health ministry paper:
The unborn baby spends around 38 weeks in the uterus (womb), but the average length of pregnancy, or gestation, is calculated as 40 weeks. This is because pregnancy is counted from the first day of the woman's last period, not the date of conception which generally occurs two weeks later. Since some women are unsure of the date of their last menstruation (perhaps due to period irregularities), a pregnancy is considered full-term if birth falls between 37 to 42 weeks of the estimated due date.

...A simple method to calculate the due date is to add seven days to the date of the first day of your last period, then add nine months. For example, if the first day of your last period was February 1, add seven days (February 8) then add nine months, for a due date of November 8
But that doesn't seem to explain 10 months. Or they are thinking a pregnant women passes through 10 months, counting the first.

Yes, that might do it. In the above example, the pregnancy started in February and will end in November FMAMJJASON is ten months. That's not the ordinary Western notion of "lasting for ten months," of course.

Best Donna Richoux
But the Japanese dinner guest did believe that a women was "scientifically" pregnant for 10 months. Not so. Matt

Once I saw a JavaScript, apparently by a Japanese lady, to show months of pregnancy. It went up to 10 months. I asked her about it, and she replied that, for purposes of counting months of a pregnancy, 1 month is defined as 4 weeks.
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