1 2  4 5 6 7 8 11
don groves wrote on 09 Dec 2004:
CyberCypher exposited:

don groves wrote on 09 Dec 2004: Aspirin is ... possible danger to some segment of the population, however small.

Fair and clearly ridiculous.

Yes, and meant to be so. It's as ridiculous as the zero-tolerance policy, I think. That was my aim.
There is no workable way to solve this problem we have made for oursleves. The only sensible thing to do, ... quit trying. Let our educators get back to educating, it's a hard enough job to do well as it was.

Amen.
They probably had, but who can take such talk seriously? Certainly not school children.

The case I'm on about involved a 12-year-old, iirc. That should be old enough to understand such talk.

A 12-year-old is still a school child, and when I was one of those, I ignored whatever I could of what school administrators told us about matters of health and safety when in school, which, in fact, we were lectured about almost every day by our officious principal.

My reaction then would have been something on the order of "This is an over-the-counter drug that any school child can buy without needing permission from a school nurse or parent. I gave, not sold, my friend the aspirin because s/he asked me for it, not because I was trying to push aspirin for profit. My friend ought to know whether s/he's allegric to aspirin. This is none of your business."

That is also the essence of what my reaction would be today. However, this is predicated upon a culture in which(1) people assume responsibility for their own and their children's behavior and a society in which(1) parents are not allowed to sue schools because their ill-raised children behaved improperly on school property during or after school hours. That means that it's utopian.

(1) I don't see how "where" can be substituted for "in which" here.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
don groves wrote on 09 Dec 2004:

My sediments exactly.
That is also the essence of what my reaction would be today. However, this is predicated upon a culture in ... schools because their ill-raised children behaved improperly on school property during or after school hours. That means that it's utopian.

Very true. But if we continue on our present path, no one will be able to do anything but cover their asses. If we don't go back to assuming some level of personal responsibility soon, teachers will truly become nothing but underpaid babysitters for the few, while the majority of students get shafted by our over- protective, underperforming "system".

dg (domain=ccwebster)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
don groves wrote on 09 Dec 2004:

Yes, the one that "leaves no child behind" because every child behind is covered by some other ass.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Don A. Gilmore typed thus:
Maria Conlon typed thus: I honestly don't understand this story. ... Are brownies banned, because they look like brownies with pot?

But "Jell-O shots" are eaten from shot glasses.

As I said, I've only experienced them in TV dramas, but in that medium I've never seen them sold in a bar. They've always been home made in small paper cases (like a cake case) and taken by guests at a party from the freezer. Which is exactly how we serve jelly in the home.

David
==
replace the first component of address
with the definite article.
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-school-jell-o-shots,0,124747,print.story?coll...
or http://tinyurl.com/4bkud "NEW ORLEANS An 8-year-old girl was suspended for nine days for bringing to school what appeared to ... violating school rules against possessing or trying to distribute a "lookalike," or something that appears to contain drugs or alcohol.

Perhaps her mom made it as a "look-alike" for the mini gel candies that were ubiquitous in stores a few years ago. What reason do they have to think that the girl or the mom had a clue what Jell-O shots are? If they are made in shot glasses, then they must look identical to common candies that are sold by the millions throughout the world.
Under the lookalike rule, the girl's suspension will stand no matter what the sheriff's department finds. "The school system's position ... We, the people, have gone mad. All the "zero-tolerance" rules mean there is "zero judgment" used by the school boards.

This isn't the first time I heard of something so stupid. There's one case where a child was expelled for saving the life of another student. She had asthma, and gave her inhaler to a student who could not breathe.

In another case, a child's mother left a paring knife in his lunchbox by mistake. He thought he was doing the right thing by turning it in to the school, but they expelled him for bringing a weapon to school.

Schools should teach students to reason. Students should understand that there are degrees of difference, and circumstances should dictate what actions should be taken. That's why we have courts and juries, rather than a system that imposes a uniform punishment whenever the facts indicate any transgression.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Maria Conlon wrote on 08 Dec 2004:

That's the whole point. Zero tolerance

> zero judgment

> zero responsibility (as in "I was just following the rules").

Indeed. Also, zero judgement ==> zero prejudice (except for any prejudice that might be embedded in the rules). As Leon ... American society seems to have decided that judgement is a small price to pay for fairness and formality of operations.

Our system of justice is very fair. It prohibits the rich as well as the poor from sleeping under bridges and from stealing bread. -Anatole France (paraphrased)
don groves wrote on 09 Dec 2004:

I said aspirin but should have said painkiller since I'm ... your stated reason but because it was considered a "drug".

Aspirin is a drug, but an over-the-counter drug to which some people are allergic. The same is true for peanuts, ... school because almost everything that can be shared presents a possible danger to some segment of the population, however small

There's a difference between peanuts and aspirin. Peanut allergies affect approximately 2.5% to 7.2% of the population. Aspirin sensitivity is likely to cause an upset stomach at most. Reye Syndrome is serious, but the likelihood that it will occur after a child takes an aspirin is extremely slim. It's almost nonexistent in children without flu-like symptoms or chicken pox (which is rare now that a vaccine is required for most school children in the US) and it's still highly unlikely to occur even in children with the flu. Peanuts are far more dangerous.
It's likely that far more people die from not taking aspirin as a result of its decline in usage than are saved by not getting Reye syndrome as the result of the same decline.
Zero tolerance policies would allow schools to expel children who take aspirin even if a doctor prescribes it, as long as it is self administered.
Hagrinas Mivali filted:
Perhaps her mom made it as a "look-alike" for the mini gel candies that were ubiquitous in stores a few ... in shot glasses, then they must look identical to common candies that are sold by the millions throughout the world.

The mother, according to the versions I've read, is a bartender by trade (or at least works in a bar), and makes Jell-O shots of the alcoholic sort as a part of her profession...I would imagine, given this connection, the girl has seen them or heard of them at some point too..r
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Our system of justice is very fair. It prohibits the rich as well as the poor from sleeping under bridges and from stealing bread. -Anatole France (paraphrased)

Your "Our system of justice is very fair" does scant justice to France's "They (1) have to labor in the face of the majestic equality of the law which forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread." (from Le Lys rouge , ch 7) (1) "they" = "the poor"
"So long as society is founded on injustice, the function of the laws will be to defend and sustain injustice. And the more unjust they are the more respectable they will seem." (from Epigrams )

"The divine law, promulgated amid fireworks in some Mt. Sinai, is never anything but the codification of human prejudice."
Show more