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Evan Kirshenbaum wrote on 10 Dec 2004:
My reaction then would have been something on the order ... s/he's allegric to aspirin. This is none of your business."

While I agree with you in general, the specific problem with aspirin and Reye's Syndrome appears to be that it's ... set of circumstances that many people don't appreciate. (I certainly didn't before this thread caused me to look it up.)

I've been taking aspirin for 55 years in that specific set of circumstances, and I used to take as many as 6 at one time 4 times a day. I'm lucky, I guess.
For this reason, I could certainly see a blanket prohibition on sharing aspirin in the school.(1) It certainly seems like something that kids should not be taking on their own or each other's say recommendation, especially when there are readily available substitutes.

I tend to take acetominophen these days and to give that to my son.

It is difficult for me to think of America as a society in which drugs like aspirin are restricted. America is such a dug-addicted society in every way (viz., movies, TV, religion, psychotherapy, astrology, psychics, self-help, pop music, aspirin, kaopectate, cocaine, etc).
Here in Taiwan, although Western-educated doctors dispense endless packets of pills to patients who expect and want them when they go to the Western-medicine doctor, there are still lots of Taiwanese who take no medications when they have a headache or any other apparently minor illness, especially when they're pregnant. They might go to a Chinese-medicine doctor, though, for herbal remedies.
(1) I could also, of course, see there not being such a prohibition.

Drugs are a way of life in America. It's absurd to talk about zero tolerance when so many Americans are propagandized into believing that taking one drug or another will enhance their sex lives, remove their pains and perils, and solve all kinds of other problems. And that includes all the advocates of the legalization of recreational drugs.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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For this reason, I could certainly see a blanket prohibition on sharing aspirin in the school.(1)

Does the prohibition in question really apply only to Aspirin, or would they be in equally hot water over (e.g.) Tylenol or Advil?
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For this reason, I could certainly see a blanket prohibition on sharing aspirin in the school.(1)

Does the prohibition in question really apply only to Aspirin, or would they be in equally hot water over (e.g.) Tylenol or Advil?

Nice try; but he used lower-case.
(Is the "trademarks-used-as-generic" thread due so soon? Where does the time get to...)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
For this reason, I could certainly see a blanket prohibition on sharing aspirin in the school.(1)

Does the prohibition in question really apply only to Aspirin, or would they be in equally hot water over (e.g.) Tylenol or Advil?

The latest A 10-year-old Philadelphia schoolgirl was taken to the police station in handcuffs for having a pair of scissors in her backpack. Her mother stated "Scissors were on the supply list the school sent home."
I can understand that sharp scissors might be considered a weapon, but handcuffs on a 10-year-old? Police Station? We have gone way over the top and are headed rapidly downhill, completely out of rational control.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
For this reason, I could certainly see a blanket prohibition on sharing aspirin in the school.(1)

Does the prohibition in question really apply only to Aspirin,

The one in question, no. And, for the record, I think that the one in question is idiotic and, as you note
or would they be in equally hot water over (e.g.) Tylenol or Advil?

would apply to the drugs that were in the pill case in my pocket throughout high school. (Okay, not Advil, since it wasn't OTC then, but Tylenol, Sudafed, Drixoral, etc.)
I was just saying that not all drug-related bans are unjustifyable, although the danger would have to be significantly greater than that posed by aspirin before I could see a "zero tolerance" policy being reasonable.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >"Are you okay?"
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >Palo Alto, CA 94304 >"I'm made of felt..Add by dose

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On 13 Dec 2004, Jordan Abel wrote

Does the prohibition in question really apply only to Aspirin, or would they be in equally hot water over (e.g.) Tylenol or Advil?

Nice try; but he used lower-case. (Is the "trademarks-used-as-generic" thread due so soon? Where does the time get to...)

As it happens, "Aspirin" is still a trademark in some countries, Canada being one of them. In the US, "aspirin" is generic, and is always written with a small letter.
And the prohibition in question almost certainly applies to Tylenol and Advil as well. What Evan was saying was that a blanket prohibition against one student giving another an aspirin strikes him as an acceptable prohibition, given the danger of eye's syndrome, as it does to me. About a blanket prohibition of other over-the-counter medications, I have some doubts.
However, I'll relate an experience of mine. I ended up in the emergency room of a hospital one time because I thought I was having a heart attack. It turned out that the chest pain may very well have resulted from a combination of pseudoephedrine (an over-the-counter medication, a generic form of the active ingredient in Sudafed, taken for a cold), a can of Pepsi (which contains caffeine), and running for the bus (which increases ephedrine adrenaline in the body). If I had that reaction as an adult, certainly something similar could happen to children. (In any case, it turned out that my heart was in fine shape.)

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
The latest A 10-year-old Philadelphia schoolgirl was taken to the police station in handcuffs for having a pair of ... 10-year-old? Police Station? We have gone way over the top and are headed rapidly downhill, completely out of rational control.

Can I blame the Democrats, Don?
Kidding aside, I think we all recognize that Zero Tolerance is just a stopgap. But who has a cure for what ails us? Can a cure even be had?

Maria Conlon
I'd start with television, but it's too late now. That horse is out of the barn.
The latest A 10-year-old Philadelphia schoolgirl was taken to ... and are headed rapidly downhill, completely out of rational control.

Can I blame the Democrats, Don?

Just as much as anyone else. BTW, I'm not a Democrat. I've been registered as an independent for a long time. If someone held a gun to my head as said I had to join a party, it would not one of the Big Two.
Kidding aside, I think we all recognize that Zero Tolerance is just a stopgap. But who has a cure for what ails us? Can a cure even be had?

Good question. I don't think it will ever come from government.
Maria Conlon I'd start with television, but it's too late now. That horse is out of the barn.

That's exactly where I'd start too.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
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For this reason, I could certainly see a blanket prohibition on sharing aspirin in the school.(1)

Does the prohibition in question really apply only to Aspirin, or would they be in equally hot water over (e.g.) Tylenol or Advil?

Actually, I think the prohibition is not because it is aspirin. It is because they (The People In Charge) won't know it is aspirin. It could be...gosh...illegal drugs or something.

http://www.newvague.com/tdis/index.html
Of course it's music. It has notes in it, doesn't it?
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