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The latest A 10-year-old Philadelphia schoolgirl was taken to the police station in handcuffs for having a pair of ... 10-year-old? Police Station? We have gone way over the top and are headed rapidly downhill, completely out of rational control.

Are you kidding? Do you mean that a schoolgirl may not bring a pair of scissors to school? It must have been a cleaver. And handcuffs... Words fail me.
Bye, FB

"Is this Miss Prism a female of repellent aspect, remotely connected with education?" "She is the most cultivated of ladies, and the very picture of respectability" "It is obviously the same person". ("The Importance of Being Earnest", Oscar Wilde)
Maria Conlon infrared:
I'd start with television, but it's too late now. That horse is out of the barn.

There might be a way to get it back into the barn. The thing to do is to get control of the programming, and then broadcast so much crap that people simply wouldn't ...
Oh, wait. That's already been tried.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Peter Moylan wrote on 15 Dec 2004:
Maria Conlon infrared:

I'd start with television, but it's too late now. That horse is out of the barn.

There might be a way to get it back into the barn. The thing to do is to get control of the programming, and then broadcast so much crap that people simply wouldn't ... Oh, wait. That's already been tried.

There's something remarkable about the ability of human beings to stoop in order to conquer. Andy Warhol demonstrated that with Sleep and people loved it. Hollywood gives a stream of celluloid sewage year after year, and New York City give us One Life to Live , which millions waste by watching it.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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On 13 Dec 2004, Jordan Abel wrote

Does the prohibition in question really apply only to Aspirin, or would they be in equally hot water over (e.g.) Tylenol or Advil?

Nice try; but he used lower-case. (Is the "trademarks-used-as-generic" thread due so soon? Where does the time get to...)

I'll rephrase, since your ignorance of what these products are obscured my original point.
Does the prohibition in question really apply only to acetylsalicyclic acid, or does it also apply to N-acetyl-para-aminophenol and 2-(p-isobutylphenyl)propionic acid?
His "justification" of the prohibition certainly does.
As it happens, "Aspirin" is still a trademark in some countries, Canada being one of them. In the US, "aspirin" is generic, and is always written with a small letter.

I thought it was generic/capital.
And the prohibition in question almost certainly applies to Tylenol and Advil as well. What Evan was saying was that ... of eye's syndrome, as it does to me. About a blanket prohibition of other over-the-counter medications, I have some doubts.

So you also think Tylenol and Advil contain aspirin?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Does the prohibition in question really apply only to Aspirin, or would they be in equally hot water over (e.g.) Tylenol or Advil?

Actually, I think the prohibition is not because it is aspirin. It is because they (The People In Charge) won't know it is aspirin. It could be...gosh...illegal drugs or something.

They could ask. Or test the pills. Back to the original topic, I can't fathom how anything could "resemble jello shots" without containing alcohol, given that there is a hierarchy of resemblance in which everything not containing alcohol but seeming to resemble jello shots resemble more closely something else entirely.
Actually, I think the prohibition is not because it is ... know it is aspirin. It could be...gosh...illegal drugs or something.

They could ask.

That's good, seeing as it's inconceivable that a student would lie about the contents. It's a well known fact that all students caught with actual drugs were only holding it for a friend.
Or test the pills.

There you go. All the teacher has to do is pull out the portable testing kit that all teachers have about their person and run it through the tests. We really should equip all classrooms with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry equipment for these instances.
That would give all those kids a leg up on becoming analytical chemists and stop the US scientific brain drain brilliant!
dg (domain=ccwebster)
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As it happens, "Aspirin" is still a trademark in some ... "aspirin" is generic, and is alwayswritten with a small letter.

I thought it was generic/capital.

I'm not sure what you mean by that, but in the US, "aspirin," in my experience, would no more be capitalized that would the name of another formerly trademarked drug name, "heroin."
And the prohibition in question almost certainly applies to Tylenol ... danger of eye's syndrome, as it does to me. Abouta

"Reye's syndrome." My bad.
blanket prohibition of other over-the-counter medications, I have some doubts.

So you also think Tylenol and Advil contain aspirin?

No. I expect that the danger of Reye's syndrome is only one of many considerations which went into the decision by the authorities in question to have a no-tolerance ban on (I forget which) (1) Not allowing students to give one another any medication or (2) Not allowing students to carry any medication. (I expect both sorts of bans are in place in some American schools.)
The part of my post which you snipped should have made it clear to you that the potential problem I saw in permitting students to give each other Tylenol and Advil is that there are dangers with all medications. I would never have imagined that I could have ended up in the emergency room after having taken an ordinary dose of pseudoephedrine, but it happened. If such a thing could happen to me, it is even more likely that it could happen to a child.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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