http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-school-jell-o-shots,0,124747,print.story?coll... or

"NEW ORLEANS An 8-year-old girl was suspended for nine days for bringing to school what appeared to be about 30 "Jell-O shots" though it was unclear whether they contained alcohol."

(I heard on the radio that these "Jell-O shots" did not contain alcohol.)
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more from the article

The girl was suspended for violating school rules against possessing or trying to distribute a "lookalike," or something that appears to contain drugs or alcohol.
Under the lookalike rule, the girl's suspension will stand no matter what the sheriff's department finds.
"The school system's position is, it doesn't matter if it had alcohol in it or not," Nowakowski said.
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Have you all heard of "Jell-O shots"? (I hadn't until now.)

My thought about this: We, the people, have gone mad. All the "zero-tolerance" rules mean there is "zero judgment" used by the school boards.
Maria Conlon
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In our last episode, (Email Removed), the lovely and talented Maria Conlon broadcast on alt.usage.english:
Have you all heard of "Jell-O shots"? (I hadn't until now.)

Yes. I first heard of them more than ten years - but then I live in a college town. I made them once, about ten years ago. Basicly, you make it like regular Jell-O, but substitute liquor for the cold water. It sets up like ordinary Jell-O, so you could mold it in anything, not just shot glasses. I used vodka. I suppose neutral spirits would do as well. It is certainly nothing to waste good whiskey on.
The novelty of "Hey! I'm eating alcohol!" wears off quickly and is replaced with "Wow, Jell-O is insipid!" I suppose you could make something with regular gelatin that might be interesting - a Bailey's and Kahluha parfait, perhaps.
Evidently it was popular with the kids because they could get more alcohol down more quickly than their gag reflexes would otherwise allow. Nowadays, I believe they use Gatorade as a mixer with the same object.
My thought about this: We, the people, have gone mad. All the "zero-tolerance" rules mean there is "zero judgment" used by the school boards.

I would never have got through school if I had been required to go to the nurse everytime I need to take an aspirin or an allergy pill.

In fact, I did get in trouble for being late once because I had to wait for the store to open to buy materials to change the dressing on some wound I had. The school nurse was called in to provide expert testimony that the dressing had been changed professionally and no (eight- or nine-year-old) boy could have done it. It was a little awkward applying a spiral bandage to my own forearm, but I didn't think - I don't think - I was any kind of prodigy. People who have low expectations of children usually get what they deserve.

Lars Eighner finger for geek code (Email Removed) http://www.io.com/~eighner / Money will not make you happy, and happy will not make you money. -Groucho Marx
Maria Conlon wrote on 08 Dec 2004:
Have you all heard of "Jell-O shots"? (I hadn't until now.)

Never till I read your post.
My thought about this: We, the people, have gone mad. All the "zero-tolerance" rules mean there is "zero judgment" used by the school boards.

That's the whole point. Zero tolerance

> zero judgment

> zero responsibility (as in "I was just following the rules").
Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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Have you all heard of "Jell-O shots"? (I hadn't until now.)

Yes, referring specifically to jello prepared with vodka not before or after I was in college, though.
In RichouxE they're called gelatin shots.

Steny '08!
Maria Conlon wrote on 08 Dec 2004:...

My thought about this: We, the people, have gone mad. All the "zero-tolerance" rules mean there is "zero judgment" used by the school boards.

That's the whole point. Zero tolerance

> zero judgment

> zero responsibility (as in "I was just following the rules").

Indeed. Also, zero judgement ==> zero prejudice (except for any prejudice that might be embedded in the rules). As Leon Kass probably wasn't the first to point out, American society seems to have decided that judgement is a small price to pay for fairness and formality of operations.

Jerry Friedman
Maria Conlon typed thus:
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-school-jell-o-shots,0,124747,print.story?coll... or "NEW ORLEANS An 8-year-old girl was suspended for nine days for bringing to school what appeared ... in it or not," Nowakowski said. =

end quote

Have you all heard of "Jell-O shots"? (I hadn't until now.)

Only from watching TV dramas about people in their 20s (although we would call them jelly shots).
My thought about this: We, the people, have gone mad. All the "zero-tolerance" rules mean there is "zero judgment" used by the school boards.

I honestly don't understand this story. Surely a jelly shot without vodka is just jelly.
Are brownies banned, because they look like brownies with pot?

David
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Maria Conlon wrote on 08 Dec 2004:

That's the whole point. Zero tolerance

> zero judgment

> zero responsibility (as in "I was just following the rules").

Indeed. Also, zero judgement ==> zero prejudice (except for any prejudice that might be embedded in the rules). As Leon ... American society seems to have decided that judgement is a small price to pay for fairness and formality of operations.

If I understand you correctly, Jerry, I see your point. However, one hopes there is some way through which appropriate decisions can be made. Adhering to rules which do not (and can not) apply in every case is foolish, and, at the very least, is setting a bad example for the children. Not only that, it's almost like admitting that there are no adults around who can exercise good judgment. There are, and they are getting ulcers over this situation.
And is the goal really "fairness and formality of operations"? That sounds nice, but I have difficulty believing it. From what I know (of our own local school board) and from what I see in the papers, the goal is more like avoidance of dealing with the actual problem which may not even be seen as a problem were it not for Zero Tolerance.

OBaue: Any institution using the term "Zero Tolerance" has made a poor choice, IMO. No matter what a specific policy entails, the name alone makes it a target for ridicule and parody.
Maria Conlon
Never mind religion. What the world needs is a loving set of parents who will take charge when we follow the wrong paths. Who's in charge now? No one, I think. And there is no one in training, either.
Maria Conlon typed thus:

http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-school-jell-o-shots,0,124747,print.story?coll...

From the article cited by Maria: "A teacher spotted liquid dripping out of the student's bookbag and found what looked like the small cups of alcohol-laced gelatin that are sold in bars, schools spokesman Jeff Nowakowski said.
"The girl told the principal that her mother, who works in a bar, makes alcoholic shots at home and sells them at work. The fourth-grader said her mother had instructed her to take the shots to school and sell them, three for $1, to make some money for Christmas, Nowakowski said."

If a child was selling brownies while claiming that they contained pot, even if they did not, that child could be punished under the rule in question.

This is not to say that the child claimed the Jell-O shots contained alcohol. I'm just discussing the general principle. I presume that a child who brought brownies to school and made no claim about them containing pot would not be punished, and I also presume that the containers used to make the Jell-O shots are the same sort as those generally used in bars in New Orleans. If the Jell-O shots had been made in washed small plastic yogurt containers, for example, and the girl made no claim that they contained alcohol, I figure she would not have gotten in trouble under the rule in question (although that might very well be forbidden under some other rule).

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Maria Conlon typed thus: I honestly don't understand this story. Surely a jelly shot without vodka is just jelly. Are brownies banned, because they look like brownies with pot?

But "Jell-O shots" are eaten from shot glasses.
Don
Kansas City
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