This summer while making a brief stopover in Portugal, I ate at a restaurant where the English translation for an item on the menu read "jewfis.,"
When I returned home I checked my OED Online which had this entry for "jew-fish."
app. f. JEW n. + FISH: as to origin of name, see quot. 1697.)

A name given to various fishes, chiefly of the family Serranidæ. Among these are Promicrops guasa, Epinephelus nigritus, Megalops atlanticus, and Paralichthys dentatus, of the Atlantic coast of U.S.; Stereolepis gigas of the Californian coast; Polyprion americanus or P. couchi of Madeira; and Sciæna antarctica and Glaucosoma hebraicum of Australia. (Cent. Dict. and Morris Austral Eng.)
1679 T. TRAPHAM Discourse State of Health in Jamaica 65 The Jew fishcrowds to be one of the first three of our most worthy Fish. 1697 W. DAMPIER Voy. (1729) I. 249 The Jew-fish is a very good Fish, and I judge so called by the English, because it hath Scales and Fins, therefore a clean Fish, according to the Levitical Law
Does anybody know which types of fish qualify as "jew-fish" and whether other languages name the fish after Jews? THe 1697 citation explains why it is called "jew-fish" but other types of fish fit the kosher criterion, so the question is why this particular fish is called "jew-fish."
1 2 3
This summer while making a brief stopover in Portugal, I ate at a restaurant where the English translation for an ... but other types of fish fit the kosher criterion, so the question is why this particular fish is called "jew-fish."

The Jewfish is now called the Goliath Grouper by many. We don't mind offending the Goliaths in Florida, but we don't want to offend our Jewish population here in Florida. See:
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/innews/jewfishcr2002.htm about the controversies involved in renaming creeks, bridges, and keys in Florida.
While scuba diving in the Caymans, I've seen huge - up to 8 feet long - Jewfish. An incredible underwater sight.
On 31 Aug 2004 07:12:50 -0700, howard richler (Email Removed) wrote, in part:
When I returned home I checked my OED Online which had this entry for "jew-fish." A name given to ... Does anybody know which types of fish qualify as "jew-fish" and whether other languages name the fish after Jews?

Toward the last question, modern Hebrew calls some kind of fish 'dag Moshe Rabenu', "our rabbi Moses fish". It's mentioned at http://www.usaweekend.com/01 issues/010311/010311bible.html and at http://www.jhom.com/topics/fish/lowin.html and, although, I've never seen it, seems from those Web sites to be related to the flounder. Indeed, http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Board=freespace&Number=16080 calls it the "Moses sole" (assuming that that page is referring to the same fish, which I don't know).
Michael Hamm
AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis
(Email Removed) Standard disclaimers: http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ ... legal.html
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
When I returned home I checked my OED Online which ... "jew-fish" and whether other languages name the fish after Jews?

Toward the last question, modern Hebrew calls some kind of fish 'dag Moshe Rabenu', "our rabbi Moses fish". It's mentioned ... http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Board=freespace&Number=16080 calls it the "Moses sole" (assuming that that page is referring to the same fish, which I don't know).

But it was a carp that was found last year at a New York fish market shouting apocalyptic warnings in Hebrew...
Removed)
...
} The Jewfish is now called the Goliath Grouper by many. We don't mind } offending the Goliaths in Florida, but we don't want to offend our } Jewish population here in Florida. See:
} http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/innews/jewfishcr2002.htm } about the controversies involved in renaming creeks, bridges, and keys } in Florida.
}
} While scuba diving in the Caymans, I've seen huge - up to 8 feet long } - Jewfish. An incredible underwater sight.
Bales of marijuana abandoned at sea to avoid arrest by the Coast Guard are allegedly known as "square groupers" (but I assume that they don't mean to offend "squares" (ObCrossThread: were there any squares before 1974?)).

R. J. Valentine
... } The Jewfish is now called the Goliath Grouper by many. We don't mind } offending the Goliaths in ... as "square groupers" (but I assume that they don't mean to offend "squares" (ObCrossThread: were there any squares before 1974?)).

There were squares in the early '50s, when I was in high school.
dg
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
(ObCrossThread: were there any squares before 1974?)).

'Square' is of course not the opposite of 'cool', so of course there were squares before 1974.
When I was a young child my elder siblings (born in the early '60s) taught me the 'square gesture', where you take your two index fingers and, starting at the top center, draw a square in the air. Interestingly enough, though, this was used to mean that the person being referred to was crazy, nuts, weird, etc., and not 'square'. (At least as far as I could tell.)
'Square' itself was an archaism that wasn't even used in Happy Days I probably first learned about it when reading about Beatniks.

I don't know if there was any strictly adjectival opposite of 'cool' on Happy Days . A cool person like the Fonz was contrasted with "nerds" like Potsie Weber. Then again, Joanie coined "dren" as the opposite of "nerd" when she had that crush on Potsie.
When I was a young child my elder siblings...

That, to me, stood out like red on green. Do some people actually say 'elder siblings' (without smirking, that is)? Even 'siblings' on its own is dodgy, but when combined with 'elder', it loses all similarity to Hiberno-English and AmE, perhaps BrE too. I assume the good doctor was writing the combination for effect. I'd have written 'older brothers and sisters', or, on a very odd day, 'older siblings' if I wanted to appear an academic, but 'elder siblings' simply will not do. Not in this day and age, anyway.
"Areff" wrote in message ...
(ObCrossThread: were there any squares before 1974?)).

'Square' is of course not the opposite of 'cool', so of course there were squares before 1974. When I was ... person being referred to was crazy, nuts, weird, etc., and not 'square'. (At least as far as I >could tell.)

Oh, that's the gesture that the Uma Thurman character was doing in Pulp Fiction ! I thought it was her invention. I took its meaning as "square" (according to AHD, "dull, rigidly conventional, and out of touch with current trends"), but was it "crazy"?

Nobuko Iwasaki
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more