Both are common in HongKong. Could anyone tell me where are their origins?

Clifford
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Both are common in HongKong. Could anyone tell me where are their origins?

Not sure what you mean by "origins" here, but there's what we call a "pondian" difference: "jewellery" is British English (BrE), and "jewelry" is American English. I'm not entirely sure whether there's a pronunciation difference that goes along with the spelling difference. In AmE, the standard pronunciation is /dZulri/ ("jool-ree"), two syllables, but a substandard three-syllable pronunciation /dZul@ri/ ("jool-a-ree") is commonly heard.
ObRon: "jewelry" could also represent the modern British pronunciation of "duellery", wot?
"Areff" (Email Removed) ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D:
Both are common in HongKong. Could anyone tell me where are their origins?

Not sure what you mean by "origins" here, but there's what we call a "pondian" difference: "jewellery" is British English ... substandard three-syllable pronunciation /dZul@ri/ ("jool-a-ree") is commonly heard. ObRon: "jewelry" could also represent the modern British pronunciation of "duellery", wot?

Thanks.
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Richard Fontana:
... "jewellery" is British English (BrE), and "jewelry" is American English. I'm not entirely sure whether there's a pronunciation difference that goes along with the spelling difference. In AmE, the standard pronunciation is /dZulri/ ("jool-ree"), two syllables...

Also with three syllables, like the spelling: "joo-el-ree".
but a substandard three-syllable pronunciation /dZul@ri/ ("jool-a-ree") is commonly heard.

Yes which seems to be a shortened version of the four-syllable pronunciation of "jewellery".

Mark Brader, Toronto > "We are full of digital chain letters and (Email Removed) > warnings about marmalade." Matt Ridley
"Mark Brader" (Email Removed) ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D:

So much pronunciation.....
Both are common in HongKong. Could anyone tell me where are their origins?

Jewelry is more common the the USA, jewellery more common elsewhere.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
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Both are common in HongKong. Could anyone tell me where are their origins?

Jewelry is more common the the USA, jewellery more common elsewhere.

Isn't "bling bling" the usual term nowadays (= TCE "anymore")?
How is "chav" pronounced, by the way?

How do you think it would be pronounced? The spelling was derived using English spelling conventions for a word that was already circulating orally. Pronunciation would surely only be an issue if there were a possibility it were a word from a language other than English so "ch" would not be pronounced in its standard English way. The same line applies, by the way, to my surname.

Matthew Huntbach
How is "chav" pronounced, by the way?

How do you think it would be pronounced? The spelling was derived using English spelling conventions for a word that ... "ch" would not be pronounced in its standard English way. The same line applies, by the way, to my surname.

I think Steve was probably referring to the "a", not the "ch", perhaps being aware that "charver" or "charva" is a variant perhaps even the earlier version of the same word.

Ross Howard
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