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I don't know what's been happening lately, but it used ... to provide a working model for was a perpetual-motion machine.

In earlier days (up till 1880) a working model was gnerally required. See for more than you probably care to know about the subject.

Very nice, thanks! That explains why I thought something physical was necessary, 1880 was about the time I was old enough to read the newspaper.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
Looks like Boeing owns several 747 trademarks in the US too. Seems like there's something special going on with the x86 stuff that ITLTLUN.

Steny '08!
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In earlier days (up till 1880) a working model was gnerallyrequired. See for more than you probably care to know about the subject.

Very nice, thanks! That explains why I thought something physical was necessary, 1880 was about the time I was old enough to read the newspaper.

And how do you like (and explain) this bit?...
"The Patent Act of July 4, 1836 reestablished the examination system of 1790... At first the application fee was $30 for United States citizens, $500 for British subjects, and $300 for any other alien."

Mike.
required.

Very nice, thanks! That explains why I thought something physical was necessary, 1880 was about the time I was old enough to read the newspaper.

And how do you like (and explain) this bit?... "The Patent Act of July 4, 1836 reestablished the examination system of 1790... At first the application fee was $30 for United States citizens, $500 for British subjects, and $300 for any other alien."

I think that was fixed by the Paris Convention of 1883. Equal rights for all!

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
required.

Very nice, thanks! That explains why I thought something physical was necessary, 1880 was about the time I was old enough to read the newspaper.

And how do you like (and explain) this bit?... "The Patent Act of July 4, 1836 reestablished the examination system of 1790... At first the application fee was $30 for United States citizens, $500 for British subjects, and $300 for any other alien."

Clearly 60 and 24 years were not enough to erase all enmity.
dg (domain=ccwebster)
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Paul Wolff infrared:
OK, while you're here. If Pythagoras hadn't nicked the3-4-5 idea ... complaint against anybody who used the principle without my consent?

No, you couldn't patent a 3-4-5 triangle or the theorem behind it because (assuming it is hitherto unknown) it excluded ... be granted for any inventions which are susceptible of industrial application, which are new and which involve an inventive step.

(etc.)
That's the "old Europe" view, if I may steal a phrase. Apparently there's a new EU law on patents that's close to being passed, see ; I don't know a lot about it, but according to rumour it will make a lot of frivolous patents enforceable.

It looks as if the law is being pushed through with indecent haste, presumably so that Microsoft can get exclusive rights to the Theorem of Pythagoras (1) in time for Christmas.
(1) I'm joking, of course. MS doesn't care about that theorem, as far as I know. All it wants is to make it illegal to use open-source software.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Bob Cunningham infrared:
I don't know what's been happening lately, but it used to be the only thing you had to provide a working model for was a perpetual-motion machine.

How long would it have to keep running in order to substantiate the claim?

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Paul Wolff infrared:

(etc.) That's the "old Europe" view, if I may steal a phrase. Apparently there's a new EU law on patents ... I don't know a lot about it, but according to rumour it will make a lot of frivolous patents enforceable.

What I heard recently from a couple of BrE patent blokes (= EstE "blakes") is that the enlargement of the EU is playing a role in this but it's the "new Europe", in Dubya's terminology, that is resisting more liberal (i.e., expansive) laws on the patentability of software-related inventions. The foaming-at-the-mouth anti-software-patent crowd (NTTAWWT) is apparently quite strong in Poland, for example, and in these sorts of countries big software companies don't have as much political influence as they do in, say, France or Germany.

Steny '08!
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Bob Cunningham infrared:

I don't know what's been happening lately, but it used ... to provide a working model for was a perpetual-motion machine.

How long would it have to keep running in order to substantiate the claim?

The patent was held pending until it didn't stop. If it stopped, no patent. Known as the Yosarian Rule.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
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