Hello,
On a jigsaw puzzle piece, there is a number of male lobe-shaped protrusions that are designed to fit in complentary cut-out recesses made in adjacent pieces.
Are there dedicated designations for the lobe-shaped protrusion and the complementary cut-out of a jigsaw puzzle piece???
I'm actually writing a patent application for an invention, and the invention incorporates a number of pieces that interlock similarly to jigsaw puzzle pieces, i.e. using a female/male joint means. However, the expression "cut-out" to designate the female joint part complementary to male lobe-shaped protrusion is not appropriate since the female hollow part is not cut out in the piece, but is rather formed during injection molding of the piece.
I've been so far calling it the "female joint part", but am not at all pleased with this designation...
thank you very much
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Hello, On a jigsaw puzzle piece, there is a number of male lobe-shapedprotrusions that are designed to fit in complentary ... piece. I've been so far calling it the "female joint part", but am not at all pleased with this designation...

Forget the "cut-out" problem. Forget the sex parts. Use belly-button terminology:
"Innies and Outies" (or spell them how you will) should handle the US market. The fact that they are "interlocking" handles the rest. If you need something a bit more grown-up, convex and concave might help.

Now my problem with puzzle pieces involves the ones that make 1, 2, 3 or 4 corners (or maybe that is enough, but some have small shoulders and others have big, acute-angle shoulders. That is harder to describe than the the ones with one outie and 3 innies. I can call "fat left leg", for example, and "hunched (or receding) left shoulder".
There used to be a brand of jigsaw puzzles (Tuco), in which the cardboard was at least 3 times the thickness of the regular interlocking puzzles. One couldn't even call them interlocking, but I am sure they were cut with a jigsaw. The pieces were all about the same size, but had wavy edges. Easy to pick up the pieces and manipulate them, but very difficult to manage color matches, etc. The worst part was that any little jiggle of the table moved the pieces so that great effort was required to put the solved part back into some kind of regular shape.
On the other hand, there was no problem putting the puzzle away no decisions about whether to fold the entire thing up, or take sections apart piece by piece. Still, I think that the Tuco puzzles lost pieces with at least the same frequency as did the regular interlocking puzzle.

(Just a little reminiscence. I know that other people's memories don't evoke the feelings of your own.)
Hello, On a jigsaw puzzle piece, there is a number of male lobe-shaped protrusions that are designed to fit in ... piece. I've been so far calling it the "female joint part", but am not at all pleased with this designation...

I have no idea if there are technical terms for these, but you might consider:-

"the male key fits into the female receptical" I wondered too about "socket", but that has connotations of roundness perhaps...
cheers,
Jim
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Hello, On a jigsaw puzzle piece, there is a number of male lobe-shaped protrusions that are designed to fit in ... piece. I've been so far calling it the "female joint part", but am not at all pleased with this designation...

In woodwork, there is a dovetail joint, which consists of male tenon and female mortise. Maybe you could abduct the terms.

john
Hello, On a jigsaw puzzle piece, there is a number ... part", but am not at all pleased with this designation...

I have no idea if there are technical terms for these, but you might consider:- "the male key fits into the female receptical" I wondered too about "socket", but that has connotations of roundness perhaps...

Why not say that puzzle tiles are formed with protrusions and recesses, and that complementary protrusions and recesses engage and at least some of them interlock when the puzzle is correctly assembled? You may want to distinguish between interlocking and non-interlocking complementary portions of adjacent tiles in the completed puzzle. At your own risk, of course.

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
On a jigsaw puzzle piece, there is a number of male lobe-shaped protrusions that are designed to fit in complentary ... piece. I've been so far calling it the "female joint part", but am not at all pleased with this designation...

My family has done jigsaw puzzles for several generations, and we've always called them "knobs" and "holes." But I know that this nomenclature is not universal; we always called the pieces on the edge "border" or "border pieces," but some families call them "edge pieces."

Let's see, I've got a book called "Jigsaw Puzzles: An illustrated History and Price Guide," Anne D. Williams, 1990... But after leafing through quite a bit of it, I have to conclude they have no reason to name any of the parts of a piece. They discuss the fashions, the changing technology, the distribution, the collectibility of puzzles... They do mention whether pieces "interlock" as important; both the fashion and the cutting methods of the earliest puzzles made that rare. But it is people actually working around a table who need to say things like "I need a knob with a bit of white at the tip."

Anyway, for patent writing, you must be able to find earlier similar patents?

Best Donna Richoux
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Hello, On a jigsaw puzzle piece, there is a number of male lobe-shaped protrusions that are designed to fit in complentary cut-out recesses made in adjacent pieces. Are there dedicated designations for the lobe-shaped protrusion and the complementary cut-out of a jigsaw puzzle piece???

Er... Outies and innies? Yangies and yinnies? Plugs and sockets? Doctors and nurses?

Ross Howard
In woodwork, there is a dovetail joint, which consists of male tenon and female mortise. Maybe you could abduct the terms.

Norm, on The New Yankee Workshop , calls the parts of a dovetail "pins" and "tails". Is that standard terminology, or is it just Norm's version?

Ray Heindl
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pins and tails both refer to protrusions. pins are thin protrusions and tails are wide protrusions. In a dovetail joint, a tail is fitted between two pins.
My dictionary give the following def of a dovetail joint : "a joint formed by one or more tapered projections (tenons) on one piece that interlock with corresponding notches or recesses (mortises) in another."

I finally decided to call the female and male parts of the joint "mortise" and "tenon" respectively.
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