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"He was in a job interview."
"He was at a job interview."
"He was on a job interview."

Could some of them be incorrect?
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Comments  
All could be correct. My feeling:

in = participating

on = conducting

at = being interviewed

Others may have other interpretations.
All are correct. The meaning will depend on the context.

For example, if you are talking about a friend then any of these would mean the he was being interviewed. If a receptionist is explaining why someone was not available she might say, "Mr. xyz was in an interview." meaning he was conducting an interview with a potential employee. The variations are too numerous to attempt to describe them all.
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Another example:

"'Good teachers will contribute to the success of our students,' said the school principal in/at/on a interview with reporters."

Would "in", "at", and "on" be all equally acceptable?
MeggPhaggSioux'Good teachers will contribute to the success of our students,' said the school principal in/at/on a interview with reporters."
With a context of a reporter, "during" is the best choice in my assessment.
So,

"He will be in a job interview."
"He will be at a job interview."
"He will be on a job interview."

are wrong?
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So,

"He will be in a job interview."
"He will be at a job interview."
"He will be on a job interview."

are wrong?
Go back to review Phillip's and MalRay's explanatons carefully. Each preposition carries an implied meaning.
It seems that,

"He will be on a job interview."

is the most contraversial. I find this in Washington Pos t:

"After you have been on an interview or two with an employer, however, you can diminish your chances of ultimately being stood up by asking appropriate probing questions."

What do you think?
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