Gibson 'to star in Foster film'
Hollywood actor Mel Gibson is in talks to take the lead role in a film directed by Jodie Foster, reports say.
Trade magazine Variety said Foster will also co-star in The Beaver, about a depressed man who finds solace in his beaver hand-puppet.

The Oscar winners previously starred together in the 1994 comedy Maverick.
The film will mark Gibson's second acting role since 2003. Foster has previously directed 1991's Little Man Tate and Home for the Holidays in
1995.

Producers Steve Golin and Keith Redmon are hoping to start filming in September in New York.
The Beaver previously attracted the attention of a number of high-profile names in Hollywood, including director Jay Roach and actors Steve Carrell and Jim Carrey.
Gibson's defence
Gibson has focused on directing projects over the past five years, attracting critical attention with the controversial 2004 film The Passion of the Christ and 2006's Apocalypto.
In July 2006, the star sparked outrage with he made anti-Semitic remarks during an arrest for drink-driving.
At the time, Foster spoke out in his defence, insisting Gibson was "absolutely not" an anti-Semite.
In May Gibson, 53, announced he is expecting a child with his Russian girlfriend, Oksana Grigorieva - a month after his wife filed for divorce after 28 years of marriage.
The star's acting credits include Braveheart - which he also directed - and the Lethal Weapon series.
Foster won the best actress Oscar in 1989, for The Accused, and 1992, for The Silence of the Lambs.
Story from BBC
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/entertainment/8143738.stm

"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
1 2
My review of the script...
http://sex-in-a-sub.blogspot.com/2008/12/little-hard-on-beaver.html

I can not imagine this script being made as written.

- Bill
I can not imagine this script being made as written.

Bill, does the screenplay ever say why a beaver - an animal that's pretty much been extinct here for four centuries or so - speaks with an English accent?
Bert
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I can not imagine this script being made as written.

Bill, does the screenplay ever say why a beaver - an animal that's pretty much been extinct here for four centuries or so - speaks with an English accent?

It's refined and has bad teeth?

"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
It's refined and has bad teeth?

In all seriousness, where does this ridiculous stereotype come from?

Bert
It's refined and has bad teeth?

In all seriousness, where does this ridiculous stereotype come from?

The received pronunciation mode of speech lends an air of refinement, and you really do see more crowded mouthfuls of uneven discoloured choppers in the UK than in North America where such natural phenomena things tend to get "corrected."

"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
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It's refined and has bad teeth?

In all seriousness, where does this ridiculous stereotype come from?

Which stereotype are you talking about? In general, to the average American, the English accent stands in for either "foreign" (German, Indian, Finnish, Swahili... sometimes even English...) or "refined" (Royalty or The Beckhams) or "evil" (anything played by Alan Rickman).

It's sort of the way French and English movies use the American accent to mean "lout", "loutish and rich" or "loutish, rich, violent, jingoistic and horrifyingly immature".
It's just one of those beautiful things that keeps the world spinning.

A friend of mine from Texas asked why, when somebody wants to tell a joke about somebody who's really stupid, they put on a Texas accent. But when my friend tells this same sort of joke, he makes his natural Texas accent even stronger.
And, FWIW, I never heard the stereotype about Brits having bad teeth or not bathing until I lived in London and heard it from English people talking about themselves.
Alan Brooks

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The received pronunciation mode of speech lends an air of refinement, and you really do see more crowded mouthfuls of uneven discoloured choppers in the UK than in North America where such natural phenomena things tend to get "corrected."

I know, I know! I just thought I'd play the straight man and set up all the inevitable US responses.
But seriously, it is - as you suggest - mildly disturbing that the American mind seems to equate "uneven and discoloured" with "bad". So shallow...

Bert
"Bert Coules"
Bill, does the screenplay ever say why a beaver - an animal that's pretty much been extinct here for four centuries or so - speaks with an English accent?

I think you have to blame John Cleese, on whom the hearty, slightly-manic persona of the Beaver seems to be based.
Any distinctive accent would do. The main thing is to make it clear when the Beaver is speaking and when the person is speaking. Presumably also the writer felt more able to manage an English accent than some other.

A Mexican accent could work quite well. He could be Senor Beevaire, the manic muchacho from Monterrey, who sees no difficulties, only opportunity.

Martin B
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