+0
John came latter than all the others.

John was the last of all the people.

John was the latest one of all the people.

Do all of the above sound right? If not, how would you revise them? Thanks.
1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
Yoong Liat
Angliholic
Thanks, Yoong.

I knew what you mentioned, and I just tried out the different usage of latter. Here is another shot:

John was the latter of the two persons who came.

The sentence is not correct. You must state the names of the two people first.

Jack and John came. The latter arrived later.

I hope my explanation is clear.
Angliholic -- please read Yoong Liat's excellent explanation again. Can your sentence,

"John was the latter of the two persons who came" be rephrased as

"John was the second of the two people just mentioned of the two persons who came" ? No, it cannot. This sentence is nonsense. You are still using "latter"as though it meant "later." We don't use it like that. First you have to mention two people, and then use "the latter" to refer to the second person mentioned.

The only correct way to get "latter" into a sentence similar to what you want would be something like this:

"Bob and John were both late. The latter was later." This means "The second of the two people just mentioned (that is, John) was later." However, we would be unlikely to say "the latter was later" because it sounds like a tongue-twister, and it would be simpler to just say "John was later."
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Khoff
Angliholic -- please read Yoong Liat's excellent explanation again. Can your sentence,

"John was the latter of the two persons who came" be rephrased as

"John was the second of the two people just mentioned of the two persons who came" ? No, it cannot. This sentence is nonsense. You are still using "latter"as though it meant "later." We don't use it like that. First you have to mention two people, and then use "the latter" to refer to the second person mentioned.

The only correct way to get "latter" into a sentence similar to what you want would be something like this:

"Bob and John were both late. The latter was later." This means "The second of the two people just mentioned (that is, John) was later." However, we would be unlikely to say "the latter was later" because it sounds like a tongue-twister, and it would be simpler to just say "John was later."

Thanks, my helpful friends.

Got it.