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John came latter than all the others.

John was the last of all the people.

John was the latest one of all the people.

Do all of the above sound right? If not, how would you revise them? Thanks.
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AngliholicJohn came latter than all the others.

John was the last of all the people.

John was the latest one of all the people.

Do all of the above sound right? If not, how would you revise them? Thanks.

To me, it should be John came later than all the others.

The other sentences are not correct.
John was the last one to arrive.
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Grammar GeekJohn was the last one to arrive.

Thanks, Yoong and GG.

For the sake of clarification, what's wrong with the first and the third?

How would you revise them without deleting latter and least?
AngliholicJohn came latter later than all the others. - As YL said.

John was the last of all the people. to DO something. The last of all the people to arrive. But it's awkward. The last one sounds more natural.

John was the latest one of all the people. Horribly awkward. It sounds like a great many people were late (arrived after the time they were supposed to) and John was even later. If that's so, then say "Many people were late, and John was latest of all" -- or something like that.

Again, most simply, John was the last one to arrive. or John was last to arrive.

Do all of the above sound right? If not, how would you revise them? Thanks.
Grammar Geek
Angliholic
John came latter later than all the others. - As YL said.

John was the last of all the people. to DO something. The last of all the people to arrive. But it's awkward. The last one sounds more natural.

John was the latest one of all the people. Horribly awkward. It sounds like a great many people were late (arrived after the time they were supposed to) and John was even later. If that's so, then say "Many people were late, and John was latest of all" -- or something like that.

Again, most simply, John was the last one to arrive. or John was last to arrive.

Do all of the above sound right? If not, how would you revise them? Thanks.

Thanks, GG.

But how do you use "latter" to make a similar sentence? What about the following?

John was the latter of all the people who came.
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Hi Angliholic

"Latter" doesn't mean "later". It means "the second of two people, things or groups just mentioned".

The college offered courses in Russian and Chinese, and I decided to enrol for the latter. (This means that I decided to enrol for Chinese. If I changed my mind and decided to enrol for Russian, then I would have to say, "I decided to enrol for the former.")
Thanks, Yoong.

I knew what you mentioned, and I just tried out the different usage of latter. Here is another shot:

John was the latter of the two persons who came.
AngliholicThanks, Yoong.

I knew what you mentioned, and I just tried out the different usage of latter. Here is another shot:

John was the latter of the two persons who came.


The sentence is not correct. You must mention two persons.

John and Jack came. The latter arrived first.

I hope my explanation is clear.
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