In the USA the names John Doe or Jane Doe is an "acronym" for a unknown corpse - but what are the similar words in British English- if any?
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In the USA the names John Doe or Jane Doe is an "acronym" for a unknown corpse - but what are the similar words in British English- if any?

I'm glad you put acronym in quotes, because it's not an acronym. It's a name or a term. Look up acronym in the dictionary.

John Doe, etc. are used not just for an unknown corpse but for any unidentified person.
For example, there are plenty of "Doe versus" court cases, although the most famous case is Roe vs. Wade, where Roe was Mary Roe, an unidentified female who usually comes right after Jane Doe when there is more than one unidentified female. There either was a Jane Doe in the original dispute, but she did not make it to the court case, or more likely "she" was a litigant in another totally separate case against Wade or maybe another co-respondent in Roe vs. Wade, and they didn't want to use Jane Doe again or the two cases would have the same title and be confused with each other.
There are John Doe arrest warrants issued when it's known that a crime has been committed and there is enough information to identify, and arrest, the person suspected, if he is found, even though his name is not known.
John Doe also means the average man. "Ask any John Doe and he'll agree with me." I think there is a movie by that name starring Gary Cooper. I was close. It was called "Meet John Doe". Most cities have one video store that rents classic movies, so maybe you can watch it.

Don't know about British English.
If you are inclined to email me
for some reason, remove NOPSAM :-)
In the USA the names John Doe or Jane Doe is an "acronym" for a unknown corpse - but what are the similar words in British English- if any?

They are not acronyms. An acroynym is an initialism that can be pronounced as a word, NATO, for example.
(In general BrE "acronym" is often used for any initialism.)

The name John Doe originated in the English legal system. I don't think it and other "placeholder names" are used in Britain anymore. At least, they are not used in such a way that they are reported in the news media.
See:
Doe
....
History
The "John Doe" custom dates back to the reign of
England's King Edward III,(1) during the legal debate over something called the Acts of Ejectment. This debate involved a hypothetical landowner, referred to as "John Doe", who leased land to another man, the equally
fictitious "Richard Roe", who then took the land as his own and "ejected", or evicted, poor "John Doe".
These names — John Doe and Richard Roe — had no
particular significance, aside from "Doe" (a female deer) and "Roe" (a small species of deer found in
Europe) being commonly known nouns at the time. But the debate became a hallmark of legal theory, and the name "John Doe" in particular gained wide currency in both the legal world and general usage as a generic stand-in for any unnamed person. "John Doe" and "Richard Roe" are, to this day, mandated in legal procedure as the first and second names given to unknown defendants in a case (followed, if necessary, by "John Stiles" and "Richard Miles"). The name "Jane Doe", a logical female equivalent, is used in many state jurisdictions, but if the case is federal the unnamed defendant is dubbed "Mary Major".
In Friedman v. Ferguson, 850 F.2d 689 (4th Cir. 1988), the plaintiff pro se somewhat famously used the
following creative variations on John Doe: Brett Boe, Carla Coe, Donna Doe, Frank Foe, Grace Goe, Harry Hoe, Jackie Joe, Marta Moe, Norma Noe, Paula Poe, Ralph Roe, Sammy Soe, Tommy Toe, Vince Voe, William Woe, Xerxes Xoe.
....
(1) Edward III was king from 13 November 1312 to 21 June
1377. That was well before the United States came intoexistence.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
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In the USA the names John Doe or Jane Doe ... what are the similar words in British English- if any?

I'm glad you put acronym in quotes, because it's not an acronym. It's a name or a term. Look up acronym in the dictionary.

I know what a acronym is e.g. NATO - but I chose the word in the lack of a better word at the moment. But my point was not this, but the possible different words in AmE and BrE.
John Doe, etc. are used not just for an unknown corpse but for any unidentified person.

Thanx
For example, there are plenty of "Doe versus" court cases, although the most famous case is Roe vs. Wade, where ... to use Jane Doe again or the two cases would have the same title and be confused with each other.

uhu!
There are John Doe arrest warrants issued when it's known that a crime has been committed and there is enough information to identify, and arrest, the person suspected, if he is found, even though his name is not known.

uhu!
John Doe also means the average man. "Ask any John Doe and he'll agree with me." I think there is ... called "Meet John Doe". Most cities have one video store that rents classic movies, so maybe you can watch it.

I'll probably will.
Don't know about British English.

This is a pity! :-(
"Peter Duncanson" (Email Removed) skrev i meddelelsen
In the USA the names John Doe or Jane Doe ... what are the similar words in British English- if any?

They are not acronyms. An acroynym is an initialism that can be pronounced as a word, NATO, for example.

I know that - did you notice I put the word in quotation marks?
(In general BrE "acronym" is often used for any initialism.) The name John Doe originated in the English legal system. ... was king from 13 November 1312 to 21 June 1377. That was well before the United States came into existence.

I thank you for the etymology of the word but it doesn't say whether you in BrE uses John Doe in the same way as in the USA.
I thank you for the etymology of the word but it doesn't say whether you in BrE uses John Doe in the same way as in the USA.

I think I answered that in my posting:
The name John Doe originated in the English legal system. ... a way that they are reported in the news media.

John Doe and related names are not used in BrE in the same way as in the USA as far as I know.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
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"Peter Duncanson" (Email Removed) skrev i meddelelsen
I thank you for the etymology of the word but ... John Doe in the same way as in the USA.

I think I answered that in my posting:

John Doe and related names are not used in BrE in the same way as in the USA as far as I know.

Oh, I missed this point - thank you again. But what are they using then -i.e. the police or the medico-legals?
I think I answered that in my posting: ... as in the USA as far as I know.

Oh, I missed this point - thank you again. But what are they using then -i.e. the police or the medico-legals?

I'm not professionally involved, but I think that letters are sometimes used: Woman X, Man X, Child X, Baby X. If there is more than one woman, man, child or baby to be named then other letters will be used.
Letters are sometimes used in court to preserve the anonymity of people involved. Two cases I've seen cited are: X & Y v Persons Unknown, and CC v AB.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
"Peter Duncanson" (Email Removed) skrev i meddelelsen
Letters are sometimes used in court to preserve the anonymity of people involved. Two cases I've seen cited are: X & Y v Persons Unknown, and CC v AB.

I see -thank you for your input. I can now figure out wheter a film I am watching is American or English :-)))
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