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John is nervous around/with Mary.

Do both around and with fit in the above and convey the same idea? Thanks.
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You can't be nervous with someone, only around someone.
A Cornish PastyYou can't be nervous with someone, only around someone.

Thanks, Pasty.

But I still have some doubt.

It's ok to say "John is angry with Mary," but why isn't it all right to say "John is nervous with Mary."

By the way, is it ok to say "John is nervous whenever he is with Mary?"
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Hi Angliholic,

I"ve been enjoying Cornish Pasty's responses, but on this one, I disagree. If he is nervous with someone, he is nervous whenever he is with her, around her. I have the same sense as you, but it does sound better to say "when he is with" not just "with."

Here's another little thing: Emotion: smile

Instead of "I have a doubt," say "I have a question."

There are actually a couple threads on this. When you say "I have a doubt" it sounds like you are doubting the person who told you, instead of your own understanding. So next time say "Okay, but I still have a lingering question" or "Okay, but it's still not quite clear to me" rather than "I have a doubt." (It's not a big deal, but I just thought I'd mention it.)
Being something with someone means that you are feeling something because of the other person; it is their fault.

John is angry with Mary - it is Mary's fault that John is angry with her; Mary is directly involved.

But it is not Mary's fault that John is nervous around her.

John is nervous, independant from Mary, so we use around not with. Mary is indirectly involved.

"John is nervous whenever he is with Mary" is fine, because it's not implying that it is Mary's fault. You can use "around" here, also.

I am struggling to explain this, I hope it's clear enough :-)
Hi Grammar Geek, I agree that you can say "he is nervous when he is with her", but I meant you can't say "he is nervous with her", as a sentence on its own. Perhaps I should have included the "when he is with her" example too :-)

Regards
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On a totally unrelated subject, when I was in England, I thought the pasties were delicious! But I never new if they wer "paste-y" or "past-y" in pronunciation.
Grammar GeekHi Angliholic,

I"ve been enjoying Cornish Pasty's responses, but on this one, I disagree. If he is nervous with someone, he is nervous whenever he is with her, around her. I have the same sense as you, but it does sound better to say "when he is with" not just "with."

Here's another little thing: Emotion: smile

Instead of "I have a doubt," say "I have a question."

There are actually a couple threads on this. When you say "I have a doubt" it sounds like you are doubting the person who told you, instead of your own understanding. So next time say "Okay, but I still have a lingering question" or "Okay, but it's still not quite clear to me" rather than "I have a doubt." (It's not a big deal, but I just thought I'd mention it.)

Thanks, GG, for the correction.

Improvement always comes after correction. So, thank you so much. Whenever I make a mistake, feel free to point it out so that I have a chance to improve.
A Cornish PastyHi Grammar Geek, I agree that you can say "he is nervous when he is with her", but I meant you can't say "he is nervous with her", as a sentence on its own. Perhaps I should have included the "when he is with her" example too :-)

Regards

Thanks, Pasty.

Got it.
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