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novelty
4: something (as a song or food item) that provides often fleeting amusement and is often based on a theme - often used attributively
[M-W's Col. Dic.]

attributive
1: relating to or of the nature of an attribute: attributing 2: joined directly to a modified noun without a linking verb (as city in city streets)
— attributive noun
— attributively adverb
[M-W's Col. Dic.]

1: What does often used attributively mean?
2: I couldn't understand the definition joined directly to ... a linking verb.
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Attribute and attributive are grammatical terms. An adjectival attribute is simply an adjective used before a noun: an old man. Novelty can be used in the same way even though it is more often used as a noun: There are lots of novelty items in this shop. There is no verb between the two words (novelty and items).
CB
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Cool BreezeAttribute and attributive are grammatical terms. An adjectival attribute is simply an adjective used before a noun: an old man. Novelty can be used in the same way even though it is more often used as a noun: There are lots of novelty items in this shop. There is no verb between the two words (novelty and items).
CB
Yes, there is no verb between the two words, novelty and items. There is no verb because novelty is used as an adjective - an adjective always comes immediately before or after a noun.
Jackson6612There is no verb because novelty is used as an adjective - an adjective always comes immediately before or after a noun.
Emotion: hmm Where's the noun in this sentence:It should have been much better.
CB

There is no noun in It should have been much better - both much and better are adverbs. Perhaps, you meant that novelty items is a compound noun. There is no need to use a verb with a compound noun.
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