Hello again -
I have a puzzle about this sentence, "it has been great to have him join me on the Learning Annex's wave of success."
I always see a structure of "to have him joined xx" instead of " to have him join xx"
I wonder if it's due to the former part of "it has been" that that latter part of "to have him joined me" becomes wrong or odd.

I am sorry if you find my question strange, I really don't know what my question is about? perhaps a grammar question or of idiom or usage.

Kevin in Hong Kong
(Email Removed), Kevin (Email Removed) writes
Hello again - I have a puzzle about this sentence, "it has been great to have him join me on ... don't know what my question is about? perhaps a grammar question or of idiom or usage. Kevin in Hong Kong

I believe that "join" is short for "to join". You could also say "joining". It is more of a description of the situation rather than a statement of what he did (if you see the difference!).

I think that it is always "join", regardless of the tense of the 'to be' part.
"It is great to have him join me on the Learning Annex's wave of success."
"It was great to have him join me on the Learning Annex's wave of success."
"It would have been great to have him join me on the Learning Annex's wave of success."
Etc.
They all seem correct to me.

Ian
Hello again - I have a puzzle about this sentence, "it has been great to have him join me on ... question strange, I really don't know what my question is about? perhaps a grammar question or of idiom or usage.

"To have" is used in the infinitive sense (unlimited by time), and, as Ian posted, "join" is likewise an infinitive structure. Any tense or time is indicated in the "be" form.
On the other hand, the participials "joined, joining" work, but that takes a rewrite of the sentence.
His joining me on the...was (has been) great.
For him to have joined me...was great.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hello again - I have a puzzle about this sentence, "it has been great to have him join me on ... don't know what my question is about? perhaps a grammar question or of idiom or usage. Kevin in Hong Kong

Join is not the only verb that works this way.
Have him see a doctor. Have him read the instructions. Have him take a walk.
Have him look at the car.
Have him watch out for cars.
Have him rush the kicker.
Have him refinance.
Have him be happy.
Have them get married.
I think maybe any transitive verb and and maybe even every intransitive verb will work this way.

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
Hello again - I have a puzzle about this sentence, ... question or of idiom or usage. Kevin in Hong Kong

Join is not the only verb that works this way. Have him see a doctor. Have him read the instructions. ... watch out for cars. Have him rush the kicker. Have him refinance. Have him be happy. Have them get married.

Maybe all these verbs and the OP's too are in the present subjnctive.

Have him refinance is a lot like May he refinance.
I think maybe any transitive verb and and maybe even every intransitive verb will work this way.

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
(Email Removed), Kevin (Email Removed) writes
Now, I've got it that the word "that" is the key to I heard (that) he said..without "that", I heard he say. I am not 100% getting it, but will try to.

Kevin. Just a note about the conjunction "that" (which is not your original question):
In English, we often omit the "that" - especially in colloquial speech. However, there are times when it definitely sounds better (maybe more formal?) to include the "that". I don't think "that" it is ever wrong to include "that" (which I have done).
There are some examples here:

Note that in many other European languages (for example, French), the "that" can never be omitted. If you learn French, you soon remember to remember "that" (if you see what I mean!).
Another problem in English is that (1) we often use "that" as an alternative to "which" - but that is another argument.

(1) I have realised that this sentence is an example where "that" should definitely be used - and similarly for THIS sentence. (Sorry. I could continue for ever!)

Ian
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?