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In joining the two sentences, is the word 'it' necessary?

Kathy put the medicine in the cupboard. Her nephew could not reach it.

Kathy put the medicine in the cupboard where her nephew could not reach it.
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Hi

The problem boils down to whether reach is transitive or not.
Since it can be used both ways, I would say, the use of the pronoun is optional in the 2nd sentence.
However, in the first sentence I feel the need of using it.

Kathy put the medicine in the cupboard where(pronoun, whose antecedent is in the cupboard) her nephew could not reach it.

Kathy put the medicine in the cupboard. In the cupboard her nephew could not reach (it).

Her nephew could not reach in the cupboard. OK
Her nephew could not reach it in the cupboard. OK

the adverbial phrase fronted:

In the cupboard her nephew could not reach. OK
In the cupboard her nephew could not reach it. OK
I have a niggling doubt that my reasoning is faulty again.
I just can not put my finger on it.
To reach sg in a cupboard sounds like I am in the cupboard too.
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Yoong LiatIn joining the two sentences, is the word 'it' necessary?

Kathy put the medicine in the cupboard. Her nephew could not reach it.

Kathy put the medicine in the cupboard where her nephew could not reach it.

I'd get rid of it.
InchoateknowledgeI have a niggling doubt that my reasoning is faulty again.
I just can not put my finger on it.
To reach sg in a cupboard sounds like I am in the cupboard too.

I just can not ( typo - cannot ) put my finger on it.
Maple, you say "I'd get rid of it." Why is 'it' unnecessary?
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InchoateknowledgeHI

No, it is not a typo







Usage note Cannot is sometimes also spelled can not. The one-word spelling is by far the more common: Interest rates simply cannot continue at their present level. The contraction can't is most common in speech and informal writing.

Hi Incho

I didn't know that 'cannot' can be spelt 'can not'. However, since the one-word spelling is by far the more common, isn't it better to use 'cannot', rather than 'can not'? Just a suggestion.
Yoong LiatMaple, you say "I'd get rid of it." Why is 'it' unnecessary?
Because without it, the sentence reads smoother. It's only my take. Surely we'd better wait to listen to the teachers' advice.
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