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Good day everyone,


This is my first post on English Forums so please forgive me if I make any mistakes or mispronounce any word in the Wikipedia article on Calculus that I am going to record.


https://voca.ro/1bgxnjuYtUd7


Now that you have listened to it can you please be so kind to answer the following questions (I apologize if the recording might have been of a low quality or made any popping noises.) :


1) How far away am I from a natural British Accent and what is the main difference between my accent and the received pronunciation accent.

2) Try to guess my region by listening to my accent, no cheating by looking at my profile please.

3) Even if my Received Pronunciation accent incorrect would you say I pronounce the words correctly and eloquently as I would only regard myself as an intermediate English speaker.


Thank you for taking the time to consider my post, I really appreciate it.

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While it is obvious that you are not a native English speaker, to me as a British English speaker, your pronunciation in the recording is generally good to very good, easy to understand, and I would say even pleasant to listen to. It is very recognisably a British-flavoured accent, such as would be spoken by educated people in the south of England, as opposed to an accent from some other English-speaking country or region. It is hard to find any actual mistakes in your recording. One thing I would point out, though, is that in several places your "th" is weak, tending towards "f" or "d". For example, you say "mafematical" and "oder" rather than "mathematical" and "other".

I am always useless at guessing people's native languages, but I would guess maybe Scandinavian. Probably completely wrong.

Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Thank you very much GPY for your opinion on my accent, I really do appreciate it from a native British speaker.


My native language is actually Afrikaans which is widely spoken in South Africa (Where I am from) most native English, non South African speakers generally say that having an Afrikaans-English accent is quite recognizable as they have very hard sounding vowels and consonants. The "flaws" you pointed out in my speech about the "f" and "d" are exactly one of those sounds that bleed through from my native Afrikaans to my English.


Would you maybe mind elaborating on my voice being "pleasant to listen to" ? As most of the people I speak English to say I should rather keep to my native language Emotion: stick out tongue .


I once again thank you very much for your opinion and time.

brad236My native language is actually Afrikaans which is widely spoken in South Africa (Where I am from) most native English, non South African speakers generally say that having an Afrikaans-English accent is quite recognizable as they have very hard sounding vowels and consonants.

Hmf, well, some Scandinavian accents sound a little like Dutch! That's my excuse anyway.

Often an Afrikaans accent is quite distinctive, even to me, I would not say that you have a strongly typical Afrikaans accent, not to my ear, though I guess it is matchable when pointed out.

On the subject of the "British English" flavour, I would say that Dutch speakers, as well as Afrikaans I guess, naturally tend to sound more British than, let's say, American. Something to do with the sounds of the native language, I guess. Of course, that's assuming all other things being equal. A Dutch person who lived a long while in the US would of course pick up a US "twang".

brad236Would you maybe mind elaborating on my voice being "pleasant to listen to" ? As most of the people I speak English to say I should rather keep to my native language .

This is entirely subjective, really, so I couldn't explain it logically. I do personally like (typical) Afrikaans accent (I know that some people make fun of it, but not me), and also Dutch accent. I loathe the horrible slovenly speech of so many people around where I live (southern England), and often I prefer listening to non-native English speakers.