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If both are correct, then what's the difference between " Just a kind reminder" and " Just a kindly reminder" ?
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a subtle difference
"Just a kind reminder" infers that the reminder itself is a kind one. Kind being an adjective describing reminder.
"Just a kindly reminder" infers that a reminder is being given kindly. Kindly is an adverb describing how it is being given.
I think we would find that in some cases the first sentence is being used incorrectly where they actually mean the second second sentence.
FYI: I find that "Just a friendly reminder" is more commonly used.

CJ
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I agree with CJ. "Friendly" is more preferred.

Just a kind reminder, please be on time for the exam tomorrow. - No adoult, "kind" is an adjective describing "reminder"

"Just a kindly reminder" infers that a reminder is being given kindly. Kindly is an adverb describing how it is being given

I have to disagree. This appears to me as misused.
"Can you please kindly pass the salt ?". "kindly" is an adverb modifying the verb (in this case- pass).

just a Kindly Reminder- is not an adjective and there is no verb to follow to allow it to function as an adverd, therefore it's misuesed.

Note: A friendly reminder - friendly is adjective and it's fine
A kindly reminder - is incorrect becuse "kindly is an adverd which can't modify nouns.
Goodmanjust a Kindly Reminder- is not an adjective and there is no verb to follow to allow it to function as an adverd, therefore it's misuesed.
Actually, kindly is also an adjective, and it's listed first as an adjective in this dictionary entry:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/kindly%5B1%5D

A kindly old man,
CJ
Hi CJ,
A kindly old man - forgive me. Isn't old being modified by Kindly. If so, then it's and adverb. I am puzzled!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
A kindly old man is a man who is both kindly and old, just as a big red ball is a ball that is both big and red.
Thanks for the comments. I will take the answer as explained.
But I have these thougths:
John looks tough but he is a very kindly man
John looks tough but he is a very kind man

Which one would you've preferred? The 1st one sounds like a 40 grid sandpaper to my ear. I have been taught and used to treat "kindly" as adverb for years.
Maybe this is something new to me.
www.m-w.com

kindly
adjective

2: of an agreeable or beneficial nature : pleasant <a kindly climate>3: of a sympathetic or generous nature

kindly old man - an old man of a sympathetic or generous nature.

(not: a man who is old in a kind way -- You can't have: The man was old in a kind way. The man was kindly old.)

CJ
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