Hi,

I'm writing an email to the staff about duplicate records in our IT system. It begins with:

Just a reminder about creating new ids in ___. Pls check that the customer does not exist in the system before creating an id.

I wanted to communicate something important but in a tactful way, so I used "Just a reminder". But it's not completely accurate, as I felt it's not "just" a reminder -- I'm also going to tell them a second point about the current duplicate records and how to rectify them. Is there a way I could re-phrase it?
Hi,

How about this? It still seems polite.

Just a reminder about creating new ids in ___. It is important to check that the customer does not exist in the system before creating an id.

Best wishes, Clive
I was thinking whether there are any alternatives for "Just a reminder...". I find "Just a reminder..." polite, but it may imply a brief message. Since the message is actually longer as I'm going to elaborate further about how to rectify the existing duplicate records, would it be fair to use "Just a reminder..."?
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Hi,

What's your relationship to the people you are writing to? Are you ythe boss, or just a fellow-employee?

Best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive,

I'm just a fellow-employee who is supporting the IT software.

Best regards,

Clarence
Hi,

Then I think 'Just a reminder' is fine as a way to start. It's in common use.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thanks.

Best regards,

Clarence

Is it correct to say "It's the researcher's responsibility to eliminate the duplicate records" or should we say "...to eliminate the duplicated records"?