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Here's what I have been able to think out:

Just can't write a normal way...

1. One centurion from an elephant chopped off the arm also called the trunk.

2. One centurion chopped off an elephant's arm also called the trunk.

In general, can one chop off something from something: chop a branch off from a tree?

Thanks in advance.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
A centurion chopped off the limb of an elephant known as the trunk.

This is an unnecessarily violent sentence, isn't it? Emotion: indifferent

CJ
Pioussoul
Ant_222«I see, are you translating something written by a Roman?» Actually, I'm just thinking how I can translate some selected sentences. This one is from a warfare manual by a Roman. «Simply put, no. One chops something off something.» Ok, so what about: 3. Off an elephant one centurion chopped the arm, also called the trunk. What I want is to put more emphasis on the elephant than on the centurion or the elephant's trunk. The text considers various techniques useful against battle elephants. Can I somehow change the sentence in this direction? EDIT: why centuri((a))n?
Here is my two cents' wildest shot:

It was off an elephant that one centurion chopped the arm, which was also called the trunk.

Another whim like a cloud just crossed my mind that maybe the following will fit better in oreder to highlight "the elephant."

It was an elephant that one centurion chopped the arm off, which was also called "trunk."
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Thanks to all who have helped!

CalifJim:

«This is an unnecessarily violent sentence, isn't it?»

To the people of the time, as violent as chooping the turret off a tank — to us...

Pioussoul:

P1: «It was off an elephant that one centurion chopped the arm, which was also called the trunk.»

P2: «It was an elephant that one centurion chopped the arm off, which was also called "trunk."»

To me they focus attention not on the elephant itself but on that that the victim was an elephant and not a human or another miserable creature... So, I guess, that's not exactly what I need.

Concerning P2, does the which-clause refer to the limb rather than to the former owner thereof?

And why did you prefer "which was" to "which is"?

Me:

«Actually, I'm just thinking how I can translate some selected sentences.»

Not to confuse you, I am reading the whole manual and translating some sentences that, for some reason, I want to.
Sorry, it just wouldn't let me log in...