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Hello Teachers,

What is the meaning of the phrase 'Just in case'? In what tenses, this phrase can be used? Can thise phrase be replaced by 'if'?
Comments  
"just in case" means "only because there is a very small chance" (that something may happen). It's quite common in a clause that begins with "but". (The "but" is by no means required, however.)

I don't see how it can be replaced by "if".

There is no verb in the phrase "just in case", so it is not meaningful to speak in terms of different tenses it can be used in. It can be used as an addition to a sentence in any tense.

Rain is not predicted for today, but I'll take my umbrella just in case.
My cough didn't seem very serious, but I wanted to see my doctor about it just in case.

CJ
Thanks for your explanation, CalifJiim. In the following sentences, the usage of 'just in case' made me to relate this phrase with 'if. Please comment.

(1) Just in case you missed the chance first time, please contact me.

If you missed the chance first time, please contact me.

(2) He said he got the water just in case he, his wife and grandaughter stay in town.

He said he got the water if he,his wife and granddaughter stay in town.
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Hello CalifJim and other teachers,

Would you please look into the above question and further educate me on this topic?
Just in case you missed your chance the first time, please contact me.
If you missed your chance the first time (and I recognize that there is a small possibility that you did), please contact me.

In the sentence above, I can see that "if" can be used in a paraphrase of "just in case".

He said he got the water just in case he stays in town with his wife and granddaughter.
He said he got the water *if he stays in town with his wife and granddaughter.

No. In this second one, I don't see how "if" fits in.
"just in case" in that sentence is more like "for if" which is not grammatical either.
He said he got the water *for if he stays ...
It means:
He said he got the water for the (fairly unlikely) situation which might occur, namely, that he might stay in town with his wife and granddaughter.
"just in case" is much less wordy, of course!

CJ
I got it, CalifJim. Thanks for your explanation.
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thanks for explanation..