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Hi guys,

may I ask you for help with these situations? I just finished my another english exercise, this time translated a document movie about Danish actress Brigitte Nielsen. I have a problem with understanding of these situations....

1) Brigitte is describing her first steps as moderator of very famous talkshow in Denmark.

I went to Denmark to do an interview and for fun they said, have you never thought about having an own talk show? And I said, actually not. A they said let's have a test so direct they gave me some questions and they had a couple editors from different magazines and I asked them questions and sort of threw away the cards, pretented to be the so-called female David Letterman or whatever.

First off all I have to say that I love David Letterman's talkshow, I like that guy...:-), but please what did she mean by "and sort of threw away the cards"...Emotion: sad

2) Brigitte is describing her house where she moved in with her family four years ago. She said that when they first got there, there were basically just four walls and that they had to work really hard to make that house comfortable...Now to the point...:-)

This is actually the villa (that mentioned house) along the lake that has most land and it has flat land, not going up up up and it's wonderfull for the kids. You can play, in fact, we built a swimming pool, which is quite useful with the kids in summer. Even the dogs jump in there every now and then, so it was perfect for us (Please, what was perfect for them? That they've chosen that house or that they've built that swimming pool?). Of course it takes a lot of patiance, it takes money, headaches, banging from very early morning to the late night(???? Please what is she talking about?) but if you have enough passion and you really want it to work out, you can and that's what we decided to do.

Please, what was she talking about in the last part of this article? What takes a patiance, money, banging from very early morning?....Maintaining of that swimming pool or building of that house? I'm lost there...:-(

3) Brigitte is describing how she married Sly....She's regretting of that step.

My mistake was to marry that guy, I was too young to get married to him. I should have taken more time. I remember also friends were saying c'mon, he's Sylvestr Stallone, he's asked you to marry him so you should marry him. So I sort of, wouldn't say fought (????, did she mean, I didn't argue with them??? I haven't heard this phrase before..),but pushed a little bit into situation that figured it was not right for me. I could probably have gotten twenty million dollars suing him for this (for what? That she was pushed into marriage with him???), but I didn't do it. I just wanted to get out and get on with my own life.

Many thanks guys for help!

Best Regards

JCD
Comments  
Hi JC,

Threw away the cards probably refers to prompts. I believe in the early days of TV, promptors wrote the script by hand on huge cards, which they placed on a tripod. Of course one often writes notes on "index cards" to remind himself of things he wants to ask, or points he wants to make in a lecture. (The questions they gave her for the interview may have been on cards. People often prepare very carefully for an interview, but then when they get into it, find it's better to throw away their notes and wing it.)

These days, there are modern teleprompters (sp??) which are simply large or small TV screens which the personality on TV can easily read, but which are not visible to the camera.

"Throwing away the cards" is to speak impromtu, or ad libitum, to give the exchange an informal flavor.

Perfect for us Hard to say. My impression as I read it is that she's speaking of the whole package - the villa, the pool, the lay of the land, the dogs, the kids. It does seem strange, coming after a comma in the pool sentence, but this is very informal stream-of-consciousness description, so I guess it fits.

Banging Probably the noise of building - hammering, things dropping, etc. (also goes along with the headaches - I think these are figurative headaches, but constant noise often produces a constant and real headache)

wouldn't say fought my guess is she allowed herself to be persuaded to do something she knew was unwise.

You're describing your actions in a clever, indirect way, saying that you didn't do the opposite of what you actually did. "How did you let that guy get you into bed?" (reply) "Well - I didn't exactly resist." "I tried to put him off - well - I wouldn't say [that I] fought."

suing him for this Don't know. It sounds to me as though you're supposed to know the answer. Previous context?? Common knowledge?? There's nothing specific in what you've quoted that seems like grounds for a big suit, even against a prominent star.

- A.
Avangi many thanks for perfect answer! [Y][Y][Y]! Actually, the whole movie was just an interview with her, so it was totally without context. She was just sitting in the chair and telling the stories from her life, how they they were shooting the movies, like Red Sonja...it was quite interesting..Emotion: smile

thank you so much again!...[Y]

Best Regards

JCD

EDIT: As to "suing him for this"...I just found on the internet that her marriage with Sly ended after two years with a $6 million settlement. On the second thought, maybe she's saying that she could be suing him for more money....Not just a $6 million....In any case, thank you so much again. Your answer helped me a lot!

EDIT2: Some women are crazy..Emotion: smile..$6 million as settlement...Omg!..Wth? Emotion: surpriseEmotion: surpriseEmotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I wouldn't say [something] - is just an expression when you are describing a situation that is difficult to define. You want to give people a general idea of what it's like but you also want to make sure they understand that the description is not 100% accurate.

For example:

"I wouldn't say I love him, but since he left I've been thinking about him all the time."

So for Brigitte she's saying 'I didn't actually fight but I did something very close to fighting'
Thank you for your additional note...Emotion: smile
Best Regards
JCDentonand sort of threw away the cards
She abandoned the questions she had previously planned to ask (which were already written on cards) and improvised others that came to mind spontaneously during the interviews.
Equivalent expression: She winged it.

CJ
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thx CJ..[Y]
seme'I didn't actually fight but I did something very close to fighting'
Hi again, Jack. Seme has a point here. "I wouldn't say" is often used as she suggests. That may have been Brigitte's intention. Your translation was a little unclear at that point about who was doing what, and it just seemed to me from the context that she meant it in the flip way, or that she did not fight. We'd probably need to go back to the source to decide for sure.

- A.
Hi Avangi,

After I read your answer I grabbed the meaning as "....so I didn't argue too much with them, but I was being pushed into situation which turned out to be not right for me." Where "I didn't argue too much with them" is in my opinion the same as "I didn't actually fight but I did something very close to fighting", so everything is ok...Emotion: smile.
many thanks to all of you again,
Best Regards
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