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Hi,
I posted about "used to" some time ago. It turned out I don't need two T's, so it's "youss too" instead of "youst to".

Now I'm thinking: does that happen with all "st + t" combinations? For example, "just to" ---> "juss to" or "just to"?

I think "st + t" combinations turn into a simple "st".
What do you think? Thanks Emotion: smile
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Comments  (Page 2) 
KooyeenUh? You want to know my theory? LOL, ok. Emotion: wink
I think those are actually different words, synonyms. So, "wanna" means "want to", but it's not a way of pronouncing "want to". It's a different word. The same is true for "going to". Emotion: smile
Different words? Emotion: surprise
Have you ever heard any American pronounce even one T in "want to" (without adding some kind extra emphasis to the word 'want')? Emotion: wink
Amy, you're trying to confuse me, don't you? Emotion: wink

Well, I think I heard it a lot of times! Are you saying that "want to" is always pronounced "wanna"?

So you want to learn English... and what makes you think I'm going to teach it to you?
So you wanna learn English... and what makes you think I'm gonna teach it to you?

Wanna and gonna are very common, but not the only way to say it. Of course, the faster you speak, the more likely you are to always say "wanna".

I think they are different words because the way you change the pronunciation of those words is not a general feature of American English. In other words, there's a lot of people (like me) who pronounce twenty as twenny. But they also say innerstate for interstate, cenner for center, niny for ninety... so that's a feature. A lot of T's are left out after N's. But if you consider "wanna" instead of "want to", or "gonna" instead of "going to"... also "gimme" instead of "give me"... those are exceptions, those are not pronunciation features.
Take "gimme". It should be "give me". So, when do you drop V-sounds in American English? Never, I guess. So that's not a way to pronounce some sets of sounds. It's a different pronunciation of a set phrase, which leads to the new word "gimme".

I hope you like my theory... I don't know if that was good, since I didn't even know what exactly I wanted to say. More or less what I wrote, anyway. Emotion: wink
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I was wondering if that applies to ST+T in general, like in "just to".
Yes. No doubt about it in my mind. Only one T. No aspiration on the T for most speakers. Unreleased T is not easily produced after S! The S seems a tiny bit prolonged somehow, though, in these combinations.

first to, last to, just to, forced to, next to, ...

I think the case of used to is only slightly different. The transition from S to T is even faster here than in the others.

lasssstu
yoostu
_______

And yet ...

We missed Tom
is not exactly the same as
We miss Tom

... because of a very slight difference in stress pattern rather than a difference in the qualities of the S's and T's? But the two sentences are remarkably close! Am I merely imagining I hear a difference? Or is there a slight suggestion of an unreleased T in the first of the two?

CJ
CalifJim
first to, last to, just to, forced to, next to, ...

I think the case of used to is only slightly different. The transition from S to T is even faster here than in the others.

lasssstu
yoostu

Hi, very interesting post.
I don't even know what to think. I think that the T's are all unreleased, but it's the S that makes them disappear, in some cases completely, in others maybe not completely but in practice no one could be sure.
Well, this is getting complicated... it doesn't matter... I'm sure not everyone does an ST+T the same fixed way. Emotion: smile