In a French newsgroup that focuses on English someone posted a question regarding the word "keen", as in "I am keen to see that movie." I've never heard anyone use the word "keen" in the US, except perhaps on Leave It to Beaver.
I was wondering if "keen" is still a common expression in the UK and if it's also used in Australia or other English speaking countries.

Thanks
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In a French newsgroup that focuses on English someone posted a question regarding the word "keen", as in "I am ... is still a common expression in the UK and if it's also used in Australia or other English speaking countries.

I saw this as well, but it was too complicated for me to answer in decent French in the time I had available.
Yes, I use "keen" all the time. It's part of English understatement. In emails to my work colleagues (where I tend to have the authority to decide), I often say that am "not keen on this solution", or "I am not keen to pursue this approach". That means that I reject the solution and they'd better come up with an alternative. They know that, of course. I wouldn't use it in formal correspondence.

An older form, which I don't use myself, is the equivalent of "sweet on", meaning that you have a crush on somebody. "She's keen on that boy."

David
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In a French newsgroup that focuses on English someone posted a question regarding the word "keen", as in "I am keen to see that movie." I've never heard anyone use the word "keen" in the US, except perhaps on Leave It to Beaver.

I use it when appropriate, but admittedly it's not a popular world in the U.S.

Dena Jo
(New York, then California, now Arizona)
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In a French newsgroup that focuses on English someone posted a question regarding the word "keen", as in "I am ... is still a common expression in the UK and ifit's also used in Australia or other English speaking countries. Thanks

Yes, it's used in English-speaking Canada, in all its forms.

Cheers, Sage
Dena Jo filted:
In a French newsgroup that focuses on English someone posted ... in the US, except perhaps on Leave It to Beaver.

I use it when appropriate, but admittedly it's not a popular world in the U.S.

I hear it with some frequency, but almost always in the negative: "I'm not keen on giving ten-year-olds access to power tools"..r
Dena Jo filted:

I use it when appropriate, but admittedly it's not a popular world in the U.S.

I hear it with some frequency, but almost always in the negative: "I'm not keen on giving ten-year-olds access to power tools"..r

The film If came about because one of the script-writers, adrift and floundering in Hollywood, suddenly realised that he should write about what he knew and what he knew was the British public school:

'God, you're right!' said (co-writer) John, 'and it's never been done, the torture, the keen types, the buggery.'
I don't know what his beef was with the 'keen types' or who the 'keen types' were (muscular Christians, perhaps) but 'keen' was clearly derogatory in 1950s British adolescent upper-middle-class argot.

(It's not derogatory in mine, by the way. 'Keen' is wholly good.)

Mickwick
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Dena Jo filted: I hear it with some frequency, but almost always in the negative: "I'm not keen on giving ten-year-olds access to power tools"....r

The film If came about because one of the script-writers, adrift and floundering in Hollywood, suddenly realised that ... clearly derogatory in 1950s British adolescent upper-middle-class argot. (It's not derogatory in mine, by the way. 'Keen' is wholly good.)

I heard it used a lot in the '80s as a not-very-complimentary way to describe those driven, ambitious people whose careers were more important to them than eating (literally; they'd go to hundred-quid-a head restaurants to talk about themselves in depth; if they'd been served a ploughman's lunch they wouldn't even have noticed provided it was described as *déjeuner au , that is).
Anyway, I digrees. It was used something like this:

"We'll have a quick drink before the presentation to go over who should say what. Aubrey's coming."
"Oh. Must he? He's so, you know . . . keen."
(My knee-jerk coming-up with the name Aubrey for that has just made me suspect that perhaps it was a public school thing as you suggest.)

***********
Ross Howard
if they'd been served a ploughman's lunch they wouldn't even have noticed provided it was described as *déjeuner au , that is).

(PostIt note to self:
Ins. whatever ploughman is in French before posting look up in Fr. dic. Back bedroom? If not, try Web)
***********
Ross Howard
In a French newsgroup that focuses on English someone posted ... in the US, except perhaps on Leave It to Beaver.

I use it when appropriate, but admittedly it's not a popular world in the U.S.

Yeah, all the peachy keen stuff is gone nowadays. But I remember the days ...

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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