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Hi,

Keep you in the dark
You know they all... pretend
Keep you in the dark
And so it all... began


There's a song that starts that way. I don't understand what "keep you in the dark" means. If it was a suggestion and an imperative verb, shouldn't it be "Keep yourself in the dark"? Or can I use the normal pronouns instead of the reflexive ones, like "I just bought me a new coat", "I just cutted me with a knife", etc.?

Thanks Emotion: smile
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Comments  
I would assume that "they" (whoever "they" are) are the ones keeping you in the dark. If it's a song, you know the rules of grammar don't apply. Assume that the grammatical subject of the sentence (they) is missing so the song's focus (you) is more predominant.

{They} keep you in the dark - they don't tell you the truth.
Hi GG,
Thanks.
Grammar Geek{They} keep you in the dark - they don't tell you the truth.
Yes, that's what came to my mind too. But then I started to wonder if "normal" pronouns could sometimes be used instead of the reflexive ones. Does anyone ever use "me" or "you" where "myself" or "yourself" would be expected?
Thanks Emotion: smile
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Does anyone ever use "me" or "you" where "myself" or "yourself" would be expected?

Yes, sometimes, when you are purposely trying to put the person in the role of a third party.

Let's say you were trying to give a friend who is lacking self confidence a pep talk. "Bambi, it's like this. I think you're terrific. Jim likes you. Alice really likes you. What's needed now is for you to like you."

Or "How can I still a soda left over? I gave one to Jim, one to Bambi, onen to Alice... oh holy cannoli -- I forgot to give one to
me."

It's not common, but it has its place.
Grammar GeekYes, sometimes, when you are purposely trying to put the person in the role of a third party.It's not common, but it has its place.
I understand perfectly. And yes, I think that's not common, as you say. It's something that is done on purpose...
And thanks! Emotion: smile

PS: watch out... using certain kinds of examples might be dangerous... you're playing with fire. Emotion: wink
Ah, c'mon. Didn't you even like the "holy cannoli" one?
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Oh, no problem GG, lol, I liked it. I was kidding, it's not that I really get mad... Emotion: smile
KooyeenPS: watch out... using certain kinds of examples might be dangerous... you're playing with fire. Emotion: wink
Barb, it was for "Bambi" Emotion: stick out tongue

Can't "keep you in the dark" mean "to hide you"? Bambi keeps her girlfriend in the dark = Bambi doesn't want others know about his relationship (?)
Grammar GeekDoes anyone ever use "me" or "you" where "myself" or "yourself" would be expected?

Yes, sometimes, when you are purposely trying to put the person in the role of a third party.

Let's say you were trying to give a friend who is lacking self confidence a pep talk. "Bambi, it's like this. I think you're terrific. Jim likes you. Alice really likes you. What's needed now is for you to like you."

Or "How can I still a soda left over? I gave one to Jim, one to Bambi, onen to Alice... oh holy cannoli -- I forgot to give one to
me."

It's not common, but it has its place.
Dear Grammar Geek,

"How can I still a soda left over?" - What does 'still' mean in this context?

Thanks,
Hoa Thai
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