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But of course.
Did we ever get an official ruling on whether a hero/sub/grinder is a sandwich?

The Liebs
Starting to drool
Did we ever get an official ruling on whether a hero/sub/grinder is a sandwich?

Not exactly. At first I was of the view that it was not a sandwich this can probably be verified by AUE archival research. Over time I came to see that at least some of these things are probably sandwiches some of the time.
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The Liebs Starting to drool

Not you too!
The Liebs Starting to drool

Not you too!

Hey, in my current condition it's hard not to.

Bob Lieblich
Who prefers droodles
I don't consider salt (= PostRonBrE "sow'") or pepper to be condiments (let alone napkins (= BrE "serviettes"???)).

Agreed about the napkins, but not about the S&P.

BrE is "napkins", too. "Dobble dibble dummask danner nipkins", for connoisseurs of a certain age.

Mike.
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You guys are weird. Anyhow, what Charles said seems more likely to derive from a religious restriction, perhaps linked to forbidding milk and meat to mix. I'll have to give you my recipe for milk shakes made with generous pork scratchings.
Matti
Not only can't an AUE person put ketchup on sausage, ... I need give my AUE dining partners, as it were.

Oh, dear. If butter can't be in the vicinity of meat, how do you ever make sandwiches that aren't horribly ... the sandwich to be kosher you'd have to use parve margarine but that's a different kettle of fish. Or something.

Or schmaltz, if your filling is meat. Or any sort of kosher equivalent of dripping. (Now I'm drooling, along with Liebs.)

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Agreed about the napkins, but not about the S&P.

BrE is "napkins", too. "Dobble dibble dummask danner nipkins", for connoisseurs of a certain age.

Thwo dozent remember it ... who dizzent ... oh, hell. Twenty-four of the buggers.

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
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"Tomato sauce" and "ketchup" are synonyms. The only problem is ... it is readily understood and no-one would find it unusual.

Based on your culinary-related comments, AuE seems an impractical version of the language.

I think you'll find BrE is fairly similar, at least with regard to tomato sauce.
My better observation revolves around your use of 'pour'. Spaghetti sauce is never poured on anything. One pours from a ... pasta he has cooked. I'm sure other words can be substituted for 'ladles', but one of them in not 'pours'.

Strange. I find it quite easy to pour from the saucepan in which the sauce is simmering. I only use ladles for chunky things like stews.

From a TV show, I am reliably informed that the "correct" thing to do is put (pour, ladle, scoop) a smallish amount of the sauce into a wok or pan and tip the spaghetti on top, stirring it around until it is all coated. I've tried that a couple of time, but I decided I prefer more sauce than that.

Rob Bannister
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