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Ladling would be okay, but it would take a long time. The goyim seem not to use much sauce, though.

Richard, did you ever hear spaghetti sauce called gravy. I've heard it used by some folks from Joyzy and Massachusetts and of course, "The Sopranos, but is "gravy" used in Nu Yawk?

I cannot say I have actually directly heard this usage, but I am told that it does exist in the New York area among some speakers (not sure about Massachusetts). However, it only applies to a tomato sauce that includes meat. A meatless marinara sauce, say, couldn't be called "gravy", nor could a non-tomato sort of pasta sauce.
How did the cook in the kitchen 'mix' the pasta and the sauce?

After draining the pasta, you put it back in the now-empty pot in which you were cooking the pasta, and you dump the contents of the pan or pot containing the sauce. Then mix it up before serving.

I've heard that it's traditional in some quarters to deliberately not fully drain the pasta, so that a little of the water gets mixed with the sauce. I've no idea why.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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After draining the pasta, you put it back in the ... pot containing the sauce. Then mix it up before serving.

I've heard that it's traditional in some quarters to deliberatelynot fully drain the pasta, so that a little of the water gets mixedwith the sauce. I've no idea why.

It's not so much that one wants the water in the spaghetti; it's just that a tablespoonful or so of water in the pan stops the spaghetti drying out and sticking together.

Mike.
I've heard that it's traditional in some quarters to deliberately ... water gets mixed with the sauce. I've no idea why.

It's not so much that one wants the water in the spaghetti; it's just that a tablespoonful or so of water in the pan stops the spaghetti drying out and sticking together.

Did anybody else learn to test spaghetti for done-ness by throwing it at the wall? If it sticks, it's cooked. This was one of the first things I learned at Manchester University.

David
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I've heard that it's traditional in some quarters to deliberately ... water gets mixed with the sauce. I've no idea why.

It's not so much that one wants the water in the spaghetti; it's just that a tablespoonful or so of water in the pan stops the spaghetti drying out and sticking together.

Thanks - it hadn't occurred to me that the sauce might not be ready immediately.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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Did anybody else learn to test spaghetti for done-ness by throwing it at the wall? If it sticks, it's cooked. This was one of the first things I learned at Manchester University.

I think I first heard about that from a fellow in college. But I think it's illegitimate (although this fellow's mother was an Italian-American from Brooklyn (FLCIA)). I think by the time the spaghetti sticks to the wall it's already somewhat overcooked. So really that only works for the goyim . The way to test spaghetti or any such pasta is to use your teeth.
Did anybody else learn to test spaghetti for done-ness by ... one of the first things I learned at Manchester University.

I think I first heard about that from a fellow in college. But I think it's illegitimate (although this fellow's ... works for the goyim . The way to test spaghetti or any such pasta is to use your teeth.

Ah, the poor Brits even the non-goyim have no teeth, wot. Inventive though. Walls already yet!
Did anybody else learn to test spaghetti for done-ness by ... one of the first things I learned at Manchester University.

I think I first heard about that from a fellow in college. But I think it's illegitimate (although this fellow's ... works for the goyim . The way to test spaghetti or any such pasta is to use your teeth.

And what, Areff, is the sound of pasta hitting a wall?

The Liebs
Who knows but won't tell
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Ray, I don't want to seem obsessive about this, but I've noticed before that you and I have sharply but ... the children are about, so a bottle may last me months; but it does so quite unimpaired in a cupboard.

This was discussed quite recently. Heinz, amongst others, have recently added "Keep refrigerated" to their labels. I didn't believe when I first read it here and rushed to the cupboard to check: it's true, so now my tomato sauce lives in the fridge. Not, however, my HP or chutneys.

Rob Bannister
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