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Me. Especially if you put the sausages between slices of white buttered bread.

Hmm. I find that bread tends to disintegrate, especially with sauce. I would use a bread roll if I have ... bacon, since they are already somewhat fatty, but I'm not consistent, since I also forgo butter with a steak sandwich.

Ah, the disintegration of the bread isn't a problem, it's only really there as a carrier for the sausages, butter and ketchup.
Far out. I refrigerate ketchup as recommend and, unlike you, generally mix only the amount of vinaigrette I need at ... if you prefer to have a store of it on hand. It should never be put in the fridge, though.

I'm with you so far, but:
This was discussed quite recently. Heinz, amongst others, have recently ... lives in the fridge. Not, however, my HP or chutneys.

I don't find I need to refrigerate HP, A1, mustard, or marmalade, if no-one has mentioned it, but if chutney isn't refrigerated, a mold can develop inside the jar in fairly short order.

Mouldy chutney is utterly unknown in this household, so here's a serious discrepancy to be explained. I'd thought the whole point - well, some of the whole point, excluding the taste aspects - of chutney was to use the preserving powers of sugar and vinegar.
But opened and re-lidded marmalade does go mouldy in the larder, if left for a month or two. Perhaps we have too many varieties on the go at one time, and don't eat enough toast. We also tend to buy the less industrialised ones.
Cheese goes mouldy much sooner if left in its wrapping. Exposure to air does let it dry out, but deters a new wave of micro-organisms.
Paul
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We always refrigerated chutneys, for whatever reason. HP sauce I've never had, but A1 Steak Sauce is normatively unrefrigerated.

I married into a family that refrigerates canned tuna. It's a miracle we get by with only one refrigerator.

I refrigerate all tinned fish - not for preservative purposes, but because I like it cold.

Rob Bannister
I prefer mine to lie down. I agree with your ... breakfast sausage, most definitely HP (brown) or Heinz tomato sauce.

That borders on the criminal. Nothing other than pepper, if even that, should be put on good breakfast sausage. That is always the way it is done in Ireland, and the Irish know from breakfast sausage. You won't find better even in Germany.

He didn't say they were "good" breakfast sausages. Anyway, are we talking sausages or something else called "sausage"? I understand Macdonalds have something called "sausage" that isn't sausages and in no way tastes like the sausages we put sauce on: I'd call that "sausage meat".
The better the sausages the less the need for any added flavour. But if you get a sausage sandwich from a sausage sizzle, they will not be very good sausages and these types taste much better with tomato sauce (ketchup).

Richard Bollard
Canberra, Australia
Did anybody else learn to test spaghetti for done-ness by ... one of the first things I learned at Manchester University.

I think I first heard about that from a fellow in college. But I think it's illegitimate (although this fellow's ... works for the goyim . The way to test spaghetti or any such pasta is to use your teeth.

Agreed. You want to know if it is good to eat not good to decorate the kitchen with. What could be more sensible than to eat the bloody thing?

Richard Bollard
Canberra, Australia
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I've always refrigerated ketchup and mustard, probably because my family always refrigerated them. If I found I had accidently kept them out for several hours, however, I would not throw them out.

I expected all ketchup to be labeled "Refrigerate after opening" nowadays, and when I was at a Cub Foods supermarket yesterday, I checked to see if they were indeed so labeled. There were only three brands of ketchup, Heinz, Cub Foods, and Hunt's. The only Heinz ketchups that were labeled "Refrigerate after opening" were the low-salt variety and the low-carb (reduced-sugar, containing sucralose) variety. The Cub Foods varieties were labeled either "Refrigerate after opening" or "Keep refrigerated after opening." The Hunt's ketchup did not have such a label.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
I don't find I need to refrigerate HP, A1, mustard, ... mold can develop inside the jar in fairly short order.

Mouldy chutney is utterly unknown in this household, so here's a serious discrepancy to be explained. I'd thought the whole point - well, some of the whole point, excluding the taste aspects - of chutney was to use the preserving powers of sugar and vinegar.

Could I be thinking of something else? As an experiment, I'm moving my jar of Sharwood's Mango Chutney from the fridge to the shelf. If it goes bad on me, I will hold you responsible.
But opened and re-lidded marmalade does go mouldy in the larder, if left for a month or two. Perhaps we have too many varieties on the go at one time, and don't eat enough toast. We also tend to buy the less industrialised ones.

I use Chris Malcolm's Baxter's. With me, an opened jar is generally empty within a month. The problem with keeping it in the fridge, as I once did, is that it becomes difficult to spread.
Cheese goes mouldy much sooner if left in its wrapping. Exposure to air does let it dry out, but deters a new wave of micro-organisms.

Yes, cheese is tricky. Trickier even than what you describe since different types behave quite differently. Dry-out is a serious problem with Parmesan, less of a one with Emmental, and hardly one at all with Cheddar. Cottage cheese goes bad in no time; others last for weeks and weeks. And so forth.

Charles Riggs
OK, but 'condiment' *is* a posh word. How many of us would actually say it, as opposed to writing it in, say, a forum devoted to English usage, no matter how odd or obscure the word?

I would. There really is no "less posh" word. When organizing a picnic, someone is responsible for bringing condiments, just as others are responsible for bringing meat, buns, drinks, sides, desserts, etc. At a restaurant at which you dress your own burger, you go to the "condiment table" to find ketchup, fourteen kinds of mustard, barbecue sauce, horseradish, pickles, sauerkraut, lettuce, tomator, etc.

By the way, while I agree that typically sauces are integral to a dish, if you choose and pour it yourself, I'd say that barbecue sauce and worcestershire sauce, at least, are condiments.

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Mouldy chutney is utterly unknown in this household, so here's ... was to use the preserving powers of sugar and vinegar.

Could I be thinking of something else? As an experiment, I'm moving my jar of Sharwood's Mango Chutney from the fridge to the shelf. If it goes bad on me, I will hold you responsible.

I'm sure I'll find an answer, if so.
Cheese goes mouldy much sooner if left in its wrapping. Exposure to air does let it dry out, but deters a new wave of micro-organisms.

Yes, cheese is tricky. Trickier even than what you describe since different types behave quite differently. Dry-out is a serious ... at all with Cheddar. Cottage cheese goes bad in no time; others last for weeks and weeks. And so forth.

Cottage cheese is definitely a fridge candidate, but it's not been pressed and matured into 'real' cheese. We also keep Parmesan refrigerated, wrapped, because we hardly ever eat it as free-standing cheese, but as grated, and a lump lasts a long time. A condiment, almost. But I don't think that if it were dried out by its manner of keeping, its powers would suffer, because the gratings must surely rehydrate as they merge into the hot moist food.

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
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