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The one thing that "tomato sauce" never means in AmE is a tomato ketchup, and it is very disorienting to American ears to hear Brits refer to ketchup as "tomato sauce". What, we wonder, do they call actual (=BrE proper) tomato sauce?

Spaghetti sauce, or pizza sauce, or even, tomato sauce.
This is almost, but not quite, as disorienting as being asked if you want salad on your hamburger.

Not as strange as salad on your pizza - but I've only had that in Greenwich CT.
Fran
I don't think so.

I seem to recall having heard of mushroom ketchup. Yes, here we are - Google offers 529 results, including this recipe from Mrs Beeton: http://thefoody.com/mrsbpreserve/mketchup.html "Choose fully grown mushrooms and take care they are freshly gathered when the weather is tolerably dry ..."

Mrs Beeton also gives recipes for Oyster Ketchup and Walnut Ketchup.

In all cases the mushrooms, oysters, or walnuts are left in water for a period of time. The resulting liquor, rather than the named ingredient, is then used in the ketchup.
Mrs Beeton does not give a recipe for Tomato Ketchup.

Larousse Gastronomique has recipes for Mushroom, and Tomato Ketchups.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.u.e)
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The one thing that "tomato sauce" never means in AmE is a tomato ketchup, and it is very disorienting to American ears to hear Brits refer to ketchup as "tomato sauce". What, we wonder, do they call actual (=BrE proper) tomato sauce?

We've done this before, I'm sure. We use context to disambiguate tomato sauce for chips and tomato sauce for pasta.
Next time, try Pepe's in New Haven. Pizza so authentic they still call it "tomato pie".

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

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The one thing that "tomato sauce" never means in AmE ... we wonder, do they call actual (=BrE proper) tomato sauce?

We've done this before, I'm sure.

Must have (=BrE must have done).
We use context to disambiguate tomato sauce for chips and tomato sauce for pasta.

Yes. That becomes clear to a Yank abroad, after the initial puzzlement.

Perhaps months or years after, but it does become clear.

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

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I noticed that for a 'Traditional English Breakfast', tomato ketchup is recommended as a condiment. Firstly, is ketchup idiom in the UK? (News to me if it is). Here in OZ, a sauce made from tomato is by convention called tomato sauce, or oftenly, sauce.

I was allus brought up (in't North o England) to say "red sauce", which was allus taken to mean "ketchup".
We also had "brown sauce", which was always "HP" or "Daddies" spicy sauce. "HP" or "Daddies" is the right propper sauce to have wi 't English breakfast, not "red sauce".
As a matter of interest, the first time I went abroad to work, I told the "houseboy/kitchen servant" (Srilankan) to put plenty o "red sauce" on my packed lunch sandwich. Problem was: in Sri Lanka, "red sauce" is always taken to mean "chilly sauce", and not the weak stuff, either! Nearly burnt me mouth off !! In Sri Lanka, if you ask for "brown sauce" you get this "chipottle chilly sauce", which has just the same effect as the red chilly sauce :-(
I think you had better stick to your "vegemite" (just like Marmite, but made specially weaker, just for Ozzies).
Here in OZ, a sauce made from tomato is by convention called tomato sauce, or oftenly, sauce. Ketchup is also available at the supermarket (among other brands, Heinz IIRC, which also makes tomato sauce) but I've never bought it and compared it with tomato sauce.

I was under the impression, until your posting anyway, that BrE/AusE "tomato sauce" was a synonym for AmE "(tomato) ketchup".
The 'Cider and Beer' thread above got me looking at a site with traditional English recipes. I noticed that for ... ketchup idiom in the UK? (News to me if it is). Secondly, are there types of ketchup other than tomato?

"Trout Fishing in America" contains a recipe for walnut catsup.

J.
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In all cases the mushrooms, oysters, or walnuts are left in water for a period of time. The resulting liquor, rather than the named ingredient, is then used in the ketchup.

This morning, with this thread in mind, I told my husband (our household's food guru) that I'd just found a recipe for mushroom ketchup. "Ah, yes," he said gloomily, "You leave it to suppurate."

And there I'd been thinking that next time they're selling off boxes of mushrooms in the market ...

Katy Jennison
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