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We also keep Parmesan refrigerated, wrapped, because we hardly ever eat it as free-standing cheese, but as grated, and a ... of keeping, its powers would suffer, because the gratings must surely rehydrate as they merge into the hot moist food.

ISWYM but to me the drying-out definitely affects the flavour. It starts to taste a bit like rind, even after rehydration. However all is not lost - chuck it (whole) into the vegetable soup pan and it enriches the flavour nicely. And after that, the birds will enjoy it.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
OK, but 'condiment' *is* a posh word. How many of ... English usage, no matter how odd or obscure the word?

I would. There really is no "less posh" word. When organizing a picnic, someone is responsible for bringing condiments, just as others are responsible for bringing meat, buns, drinks, sides, desserts, etc.

While she'll have no problem with 'meat', 'buns', 'drinks', and 'desserts', your average American, or even English, bird is not going to know what you're talking about if you ask her to bring 'condiments', let alone 'sides' to your picnic. These are posh words restricted to ErkE, LauraE, myE, and other obscure Es, not words used by the general public. Ask her to bring some mustard, ketchup, salt and pepper, and you'll be in business.
At a restaurant at which you dress your own burger, you go to the "condiment table" to find ketchup, fourteen kinds of mustard, barbecue sauce, horseradish, pickles, sauerkraut, lettuce, tomator, etc.

People go to the condiment table, sure, but they don't have a name for that table. They know where it is and they have a general idea what is on it; that's more than enough for Joe and Jane Sixpack. (Hi, Coop, who probably does know what a condiment is, by the way. I'd expect such words to be in TCE, but Areff has the final word.)
By the way, while I agree that typically sauces are integral to a dish, if you choose and pour it yourself, I'd say that barbecue sauce and worcestershire sauce, at least, are condiments.

I agree totally, but if Sean comes over to dinner I'd be the last to ask him what condiment he'd like on his steak. That would border on the rude, for it isn't nice to confuse your guests, especially when they're hungry.

Charles Riggs
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... Yes, cheese is tricky. Trickier even than what you ... time; others last for weeks and weeks. And so forth.

Cottage cheese is definitely a fridge candidate, but it's not been pressed and matured into 'real' cheese. We also keep ... of keeping, its powers would suffer, because the gratings must surely rehydrate as they merge into the hot moist food.

My food processor, wonderful and powerful as it is, refuses to grate stiffened Parmesan. And, stiff or not, I refuse to grate it by hand.
Charles Riggs
I would. There really is no "less posh" word. When ... are responsible for bringing meat, buns, drinks, sides, desserts, etc.

While she'll have no problem with 'meat', 'buns', 'drinks', and 'desserts', your average American, or even English, bird is not ... used by the general public. Ask her to bring some mustard, ketchup, salt and pepper, and you'll be in business.

"Sides" in the sense of "side dishes" is not a native UK word, posh or otherwise. The only place I ever see it here is in American- owned, or at least American-style, fast food places. In fact, I think it's only ever in KFC.

David
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replace usenet with the
While she'll have no problem with 'meat', 'buns', 'drinks', and ... some mustard, ketchup,salt and pepper, and you'll be in business.

"Sides" in the sense of "side dishes" is not a native UK word, posh or otherwise. The only place I ever see it here is in American- owned, or at least American-style, fast food places. In fact, I think it's only ever in KFC.

And one needs to check when asked to bring "buns", because even inside the Br Is the word refers to at least three distinct classes of baked things. For me they're sweet yeast "cakes", with or without fruit, crosses or icing.
I add my testimony to that of those who maintain that "condiment" is just a word, and a common one, with no social-status loading. A rarer word, limited to chutneys, viscous pickles, store sauces (including ketchups), and the like is "tracklements".

Mike.
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sauces (including ketchups)

Oy!
sauces (including ketchups)

Oy!

Shouldn't that have been "(Oy!)"?

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
the Omrud filted:
"Sides" in the sense of "side dishes" is not a native UK word, posh or otherwise. The only place I ever see it here is in American- owned, or at least American-style, fast food places. In fact, I think it's only ever in KFC.

Or any other place that sells chicken "to go": Church's, El Pollo Asado, Long John Silver (which mainly sells fish but also does boneless chicken "planks"), or the deli counter at any supermarket...if I asked someone to bring "sides" to a picnic, I'd expect something like macaroni, potato salad, cole slaw, or baked beans..r
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actually going words used salt

"Sides" in the sense of "side dishes" is not a ... places. In fact, I think it's only ever in KFC.

And one needs to check when asked to bring "buns", because even inside the Br Is the word refers to ... no social-status loading. A rarer word, limited to chutneys, viscous pickles, store sauces (including ketchups), and the like is "tracklements".

Good grief, Mike, where do you get that vocabulary from? Tracklements don't seem to appear in either my Chambers or my SOED.

But I'll claim that neither 'posh' nor 'condiments' is a posh word in BrE. The latter smacks of 'cruet', and doesn't cut the mustard.
Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
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