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I add my testimony to that of those who maintain that "condiment" is just a word, and a common one, with no social-status loading. A rarer word, limited to chutneys, viscous pickles, store sauces (including ketchups), and the like is "tracklements".

I've just asked OldBloke what he'd call "salt, pepper, vinegar, sauce, that kind of thing" and he said, "condiments".

The point of education is to correct ignorance. It cannot deal with stupidity. (Mortimer Hebblethwaite, uk.misc)
Oy!

Shouldn't that have been "(Oy!)"?

Yes, it should have. But it was an invalid oy anyhow, as I and others have explained once or twice over the years. There are more kinds of sauce than are dreamed of in Richard's sea-girt philosophy. I think it's time he moved on to custard, which we don't seem to have mauled to death yet.

Mike.
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And one needs to check when asked to bring "buns", ... viscous pickles, store sauces(including ketchups), and the like is "tracklements".

Good grief, Mike, where do you get that vocabulary from?Tracklements don't seem to appear in either my Chambers or my SOED. But I'll claim that neither 'posh' nor 'condiments' is a posh wordin BrE. The latter smacks of 'cruet', and doesn't cut the mustard.

"Posh", well, of course: you note that I didn't use it, and only ever do so for the thrill of the illicit, like going down East. This excitement in my otherwise quiet little life I will not be denied. I know, too, what you mean about "condiment": it carries a Betjeman "Thank you, I have had sufficent" flavour; but it is the only single word we have. Apart from "tracklement", of course that's a good one, isn't it?

Mike.
Shouldn't that have been "(Oy!)"?

Yes, it should have. But it was an invalid oy anyhow, as I and others have explained once or twice ... philosophy. I think it's time he moved on to custard, which we don't seem to have mauled to death yet.

But not until I add a drop of S(Oy!) sauce.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.u.e)
word? a posh classes without is rarer (including

It has a convincing ring to it; but researches lead me to doubt its breeding:
http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-tra1.htm
I'll grant condiments in kitchen-talk, but not above the salt at table.
Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
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To me, 'sauce' describes how something is used, rather than ... sauce, or it can have a sauce poured over it.

There are also dipping sauces, of course.
Maple syrup in the bottle is just maple syrup, but when you pour it over your pancakes you are using it as a sauce.

To me, maple syrup seems distinctly un-saucelike, no matter how it is used. Perhaps this is because it consists of ... when poured over a pudding (=AmE dessert), to be a sauce? But poured custard definitely IS a sauce, for example.

Sorry, Roland: it looks as though my previous reply to this did not get sent.
"What kind of sauce would you like on your pudding? There's chocolate sauce, brandy sauce, raspberry coulis, custard or just plain cream."

In that kind of context, I'd say that you are clearly thinking of the cream as being a kind of sauce, even though you wouldn't call it a sauce directly. That fact that cream is not normally called a sauce is probably something to do with its having so many other possible uses. A 'cream sauce' would suggest something containing cream and other ingredients, never pure cream.
Similarly, I wouldn't call poured custard 'custard sauce', even when it's clearly being used as one. To me, that's the usual sort of custard unless otherwise specified or clear from context (baked custard, custard tart, etc.).

Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus a u e
at tpg dot com dot au
"Posh", well, of course: you note that I didn't use ... "tracklement", of course that's a good one, isn't it?

It has a convincing ring to it; but researches lead me to doubt its breeding: http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-tra1.htm I'll grant condiments in kitchen-talk, but not above the salt at table.

I have no objection to that policy.
On "tracklements", surely nobody could doubt the breeding of a word apparently coined by Dorothy Hartley? (No degree of respect is too great for a writer whose Food In England ends with an appendix on how to build a privy.)

Mike.
I add my testimony to that of those who maintain that "condiment" is just a word, and a common one, with no social-status loading.

A clear and present danger of being daily exposed to AUE is that one can lose touch with the English of the ordinary man. This and a couple other recent posts are evidence of this, looking at this word alone. This trap that RRs can into is yet another reason why newbies should always be welcomed here people not yet contaminated.
Charles Riggs
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"condiment" A SOED. word mustard. ever I single

It has a convincing ring to it; but researches lead ... condiments in kitchen-talk, but not above the salt at table.

I have no objection to that policy. On "tracklements", surely nobody could doubt the breeding of a word apparently coined ... great for a writer whose Food In England ends with an appendix on how to build a privy.)

COD10 has tracklement:
tracklement
· n. Brit. rare: a savoury jelly, served with meat. – ORIGIN 1950s: of unknown origin.

Robin
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