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I've eaten at Pepe's many times, but I usually have the white clam pizza.

Good, isn't it?
I never heard anyone call it pie, but then I probably wasn't listening.

I was exaggerating a bit for effect with the "still call it tomato pie" business, I confess. But there is , as I recall, a photo on the wall at Pepe's that shows the establishment as it was in earlier days, complete with a sign offering "tomato pie" for sale in large friendly letters.
It's not called "pie" it's "a pie".

Confession over, I still expect that "let me have a tomato pie" (as opposed to "let me have a white clam pie") would not sound out of place; however that's probably true in any pizza place in the Northeast (at a minimum). Yes, that would pretty much have to be " a pie" (or "two pies", etc.) the dish itself is not "pie" but "pizza", however "a (whole) pizza" is also "a (whole) pie" whereas a "slice (of pizza)" is never(?) a "slice of pie".

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

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It's not called "pie" it's "a pie".

Confession over, I still expect that "let me have a tomato pie" (as opposed to "let me have a white clam pie") would not sound out of place; however that's probably true in any pizza place in the Northeast (at a minimum).

Actually, not so. In Boston this usage of "pie" is, apparently, unknown. However, the pizza available in Boston is of such poor quality that it should be regarded, instead, as "pizza" rather than pizza, though it's not as bad as Chicago "pizza" (or Seattle "pizza", BTAWNS).
Yes, that would pretty much have to be " a pie" (or "two pies", etc.) the dish itself ... "a (whole) pizza" is also "a (whole) pie" whereas a "slice (of pizza)" is never(?) a "slice of pie".

Correct. That's the New York City Region usage, and might not be used in New Haven.
New Haven actually cannot be said to have a true pizza culture. It has three or so places that make good pizza, and the rest is horrible.
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Is the celebrated BrE condiment known as "HP sauce" a form of "brown sauce"?

Not merely a form of it, but the veritable type-specimen, the canonical brown sauce against which the brownness and the ... at the moment. Perhaps a genuine Brit is still reading this thread and will be along to enlighten us presently).

Hovering in the offing you'll discern A1 Sauce and Daddies Sauce. Is A1 Sauced from the US, though?
Matti
Not merely a form of it, but the veritable type-specimen, ... this thread and will be along to enlighten us presently).

Hovering in the offing you'll discern A1 Sauce and Daddies Sauce. Is A1 Sauced from the US, though?

A1 Sauce is indeed from the US, a form of bottled "steak sauce", not a sauce of course but a condiment. I've always assumed that HP Sauce was similar.
A1 Sauce competes, to some degree, with ketchup, or its manufacturer long wanted it to (= BizarroMattE "to do").
This is almost, but not quite, as disorienting as being asked if you want salad on your hamburger.

I suppose you think that beetroot on a hamburger is strange then....

To my mind:
"Salad" seems strange (the word, not the thing itself; lettuce and tomato is a standard garnish for American hamburgers and cheeseburgers, of course, with or without pickle slices I prefer without).

Pickled beetroot (=AmE pickled beet(s)) seems strange in itself, no matter how it is called.
The beetroot takes the place of the American pickle, by adding a tart flavour to the melange. McDonald here have a hamburger called, I believe, McOz. Apparently when it was introduced, there was a national beetroot shortage.

Now that, I am prepared to believe.
In the interest of full disclosure, my preferred hamburger:
Cooked very rare, on a lightly toasted bun with sesame seeds (or, alternatively, a good fresh Portuguese or French-style roll), iceberg lettuce, locally grown ripe tomato, ketchup. Cheese, melted on the burger , not the bun, is optional. Without the cheese, barbecue sauce (K.C. Masterpiece or similar brand) is an alternative to ketchup. Many kinds of cheese are good: cheddar, swiss, mozzarella, or more exotic types such as chevre and Wemsleydale if I'm in a gourmet kind of mood (and there's some in the fridge).

Processed cheese is also surprizingly palatable in this application, particularly when the cooking is done outdoors. But it must be "real" processed ("American") cheese consisting mainly of actual cheese, not the individually wrapped individual cheese food substitute slices consisting chiefly of vegetable oil. The patty should be seasoned before cooking with a substantial dusting of garlic powder and nothing else. And of course one must not over-handle the ground beef while forming the patty.
Alternatively: patty melt (i.e. grilled (on the griddle)-cheese sandwich on light rye bread with the hamburger patty inserted in the middle), rare, swiss (emmenthaler) cheese, hold the onions; ketchup.

When I was much younger: grilled (i.e. on a gridiron over charcoal) hamburger patty, topped with marshmallow fluff, on a bun. No cheese, no veggies, no nothing else. Don't knock it until you've tried it.

For reasons of health, I try not to eat any of these very often nowadays.

Also for reasons of health, it's almost impossible to obtain a rare hamburger in a restaurant since the emergence of that nasty strain of e. coli some years back.
Please don't anyone take me as representing my country's tastes generally. My strong personal dislike of raw onion, mustard, and pickles amounts to an outright refusal to eat hamburgers containing any of these, to the astonished incomprehension of most of my fellow Americans (my spouse included).

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
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Actually, not so.

I suppose that's right.
In Boston this usage of "pie" is, apparently, unknown. However, the pizza available in Boston is of such poor quality that it should be regarded, instead, as "pizza" rather than pizza, though it's not as bad as Chicago "pizza" (or Seattle "pizza", BTAWNS).

Well, as a college roomie of mine liked to say, "de gustibus ain't what they used to be."
I lived in Boston for a while, a while ago, and developed a taste for -House-of-Pizza pizza (a/k/a "Greek Pizza"), though I would never be tempted to confuse it with anything recognized as pizza in NYC and environs. "Pies" when present in those establishments were of filo dough filled with spinach and feta cheese (spanikopita).
New Haven actually cannot be said to have a true pizza culture. It has three or so places that make good pizza, and the rest is horrible.

I would say the same about New Jersey. Fortunately, one of the good places is just around the corner from me; it's a restaraunt that happens to sell pizza rather than a pizza joint as such. The pizza comes in one size only, and is remarkably moderately priced.

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
I lived in Boston for a while, a while ago, and developed a taste for The Greek "pizza" phenomenon is known in New York City too. Famous Original Spiro's, that sort of thing. Horrible stuff. The Greeks should stick to what they do best: (a) diners/coffeeshops (that's 'coffeeshop' in the New Yorkese sense), (b) Greek (= NonGrE "Turkish") restaurants proper, and (c) gyro (= ApproxBrE "doner kebab") joints.

As for Boston, I don't know what's worse there, the Greek "pizza" or the Irish "pizza" which competes with it. Boston BTW has more Irish spaghetti-and-meatball jernts than any other city in the US. LKF.
Not merely a form of it, but the veritable type-specimen, ... this thread and will be along to enlighten us presently).

Hovering in the offing you'll discern A1 Sauce and Daddies Sauce.Is A1 Sauced from the US, though?

Brand's A1 Sauce used to carry the claim that it had been invented by a cook named Brand in the employ of K. ?William IV. "Brand", the sailor monarch was claimed to have cried, "this sauce is A1!" So, very UK.
(I have made tomato sauce/ketchup, mushroom ketchup, and a little-known Beetonian number called "Pontac ketchup", which is based on elderberries. In my home-made tomato gloop, chillies are readily detectible.)

Mike.
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I lived in Boston for a while, a while ago, ... of filo dough filled with spinach and feta cheese (spanikopita).

The Greek "pizza" phenomenon is known in New York City too. Famous Original Spiro's, that sort of thing. Horrible stuff.

I Have Always Known that New London, Connecticut has excellent pizza. Last year I found myself driving through New London, so of course I went to a pizza place. Not only was the pizza lousy, but the people working there thought I was weird for asking about New London pizza.

SML
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