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This was before the era of pre-made jarred pasta sauces (the ordinary name for which in AmE is "tomato sauce").

This is news to me. I am familiar with canned "tomato sauce", which is something on the order of crushed tomatoes, with much more liquid than tomato paste, but not much in the way of spices. I can't imagine anyone putting that on pasta directly.

Me neither, but it may have been done. I think canned tomato sauce of the sort you probably mean has, however, been used as a component in some recipes for tomato sauce. Moreover, there have also been true canned tomato sauces like jarred tomato sauce, a poor substitute for the real thing, but there's one brand that's only sold in Connecticut ("Don Pepino") that's above average for the genre, despite the metallic element.
Ketchup, maybe but not for adults, surely.

Different times, different mores.
Not mine,though. If "pasta sauce" didn't exist as a phrase back in the day, it does now, and must surely have come into existence because both senses of tomato sauce could not peacefully coexist.

But "pasta sauce" can mean non-tomato things too, at least in my dialect. I'll grant you that there's some important sense in which the default sort of sauce for pasta seems to be some sort of tomato sauce (probably some sort of marinara-type sauce).
Yes, but as we've observed before, that misses out a step in evolution. In the 1906 Beeton, all ketchups were ... there isn't a tomato one, though another plate shows that Heinz's (sic) Baked Beans in Tomato Sauce were already established.

The Heinz baked beans type of tomato sauce is still another category. It's not ketchup, and it's not tomato sauce in the common modern sense.
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I'm pretty curious, I admit. But, being inquisitive too, I wonder when and why Charles stopped being a vegetarian.

I don't recall when Charles became a vegetarian. I do remember him bemoaning the lack of good fillet steak in Ireland.

I remember him talking about cooking hamburgers and meatloaf.

He's a Buddhist, though.
I'm pretty curious, I admit. But, being inquisitive too, I wonder when and why Charles stopped being a vegetarian.

I don't recall when Charles became a vegetarian. I do remember him bemoaning the lack of good fillet steak in Ireland.

Fran is totally correct. While I bemoan the fact I enjoy the taste of dead cooked animals, I haven't entirely stopped eating them. Mostly though, I am a vegetarian, as befits a person of my refined East Coast sensibilities. But you can be sure that my friend No Ears, a man not anywhere near the East or even the West Coast, eats at least one bloody steak a week.
This was before the era of pre-made jarred pasta sauces (the ordinary name for which in AmE is "tomato sauce").

This is news to me. I am familiar with canned "tomato sauce", which is something on the order of crushed ... batch, there must indeed be a use of the phrase in both senses, acceptable even in the same head-space somehow.

That's the way it is in my dialect. "Tomato sauce" is tomato-based pasta sauce that isn't "meat sauce". It would have canned tomato sauce (or possibly fresh tomatoes) and tomato paste as a base.

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That's the way it is in my dialect. "Tomato sauce" is tomato-based pasta sauce that isn't "meat sauce".

That's interesting. I'd say that for me "tomato sauce" includes tomato-based pasta sauces that include meat (which I call "meat sauce"), though I can imagine a sauce that was so meat-oriented that it lost all tomato-ness and ceased to be notionally tomato sauce.
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I recall asking for Worcestershire sauce in Jakarta. After a length discussion the waiter finally understood that what I wanted was "kecap Inggeris". I eventually learned to ask for "Lea Perrin". Izzy

At the Vicksburg Nattional Military Park in Vicksburg Mississippi the ironclad warship the U.S.S.Cairo {prononced KAYRO} on display{sunk in 1863 and raised in 1963}, one of the items recovered from the wreck is a Lea & Perrins bottle, they have not changed the shape or size of of the bottle in all this time.
I don't recall when Charles became a vegetarian. I do remember him bemoaning the lack of good fillet steak in Ireland.

Fran is totally correct. While I bemoan the fact I enjoy the taste of dead cooked animals, I haven't entirely ... a man not anywhere near the East or even the West Coast, eats at least one bloody steak a week.

With plenty of *** chips; eh, vicar.

Ray
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So I have a Cagney thesis to match Areff's Fonzie ... the time that the Cagney and Lacey series was broadcast.

I say HARass. The first time I really noticed the harASS pronunciation was in "Ooh, I've had a lot of harASSment Betty".
Frank Spencer in "Some mothers do 'ave 'em". This would be in 1973-4.
Ray
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