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Yes, but as we've observed before, that misses out a ... Heinz's (sic) Baked Beans in Tomato Sauce were already established.

The Heinz baked beans type of tomato sauce is still another category. It's not ketchup, and it's not tomato sauce in the common modern sense.

You are dead right, Areff. What's more, the stuff in baked beans varies in taste between countries. Even after more than 30 years in France, my family demands that each time I visit I take a couple of dozen cans of Heinz beans made in the UK. The French Heinz beans taste quite different.

Robin
I agree. I would never have made that latter association.

Nor would I. I'd say "... what salad cream is to mayonnaise", but I'm not sure whether salad cream is known in America.

I don't know it is is anything like salad cream, but there is something vile called Miracle Whip around here.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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They will never sell anything named Mueslix as food in ... is big in Europe will kill it here{remember Slim Whitman?}.

I remember the early '80s (1981-ish) TV ad campaign for the Slim Whitman compilation recording. They emphasized that he'd sold more records than the Beatles and Elvis combined, or something like that. No one had ever heard of him before.

From a Slim Whitman site:

Though he was once known as "America's Favorite Folksinger," Slim Whitman was, for the majority of his career, more famous in Europe than in the United States. Best remembered for his early-'50s hit singles like "Love Song of the Waterfall," "Indian Love Call," and "Singing Hills," Whitman was an excellent yodeler known for singing mellow, romantic and clean-cut songs.

His name is quite familiar to me, but I can't remember any of his songs.

Robin
Where do the French stress "kilometer(re)"? As I recall, the Spanishstress the second syllable.

It's rather like KEELo-mettre but the stress is very slight.

OK, thanks. I had thought second syllable. But you are johnnie-on-the-spot.
There's a scandal currently rocking the globe involving the London office of the law firm of Baker & McKenzie (which ... do the presumptively BrE speakers involved (the stainer and the stainee) refer to ketchup as "ketchup" rather than "tomato sauce"?

Because the words are synonyms.

Rob Bannister
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Nor would I. I'd say "... what salad cream is to mayonnaise", but I'm not sure whether salad cream is known in America.

I don't know it is is anything like salad cream, but there is somethingvile called Miracle Whip around here.

Kraft's brand name for "salad dressing". I get some generic versions, and I don't think it's vile, but tit for taste, or something like that.

I think Miracle Whip et al are just more vinegarized versions of mayo. In our picaresque years, salad dressing and peanut butter on bread were our preferred lunches, with salad dressing and ketchup a close second. My brother preferred mustard and salad dressing on bread.
I remember the early '80s (1981-ish) TV ad campaign for ... like that. No one had ever heard of him before.

From a Slim Whitman site: Though he was once known as "America's Favorite Folksinger," Slim Whitman was, for the ... romantic and clean-cut songs. His name is quite familiar to me, but I can't remember any of his songs.

I am with Areff on this. Same astonishment that I felt when the TV promotions for "Box Car Willie" came out. Oh, they sang OK, but my taste in country music had been formed long before, so I found Slim and Willie unimpressive, and totally unfamiliar.
I don't suppose the current BrE second syllable stress on kilometre and harass has arrived as a conscious copying from elsewhere either. Words change.

Interesting - both versions are common here. I say HARass and KILometre. The latter because that is what I was ... "Cagney and Lacey", where the protagonists pronounced it with stress on the second syllable. I think that was about 1983-1985.

I suspect Australians are also a bit confused about kilometres, although first syllable stress is by far the most common. However, the American haRASS seems to have completely taken over.
Words which cause me greater concern, and which I hear mispronounced regularly on the television, are 'distribute' and 'contribute'. I have a feeling the stress is trying to move onto the first syllable, but at the moment, it seems (in the mouths of many journalists) to have stuck to the 'bute" syllable.

Rob Bannister
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Where do the French stress "kilometer(re)"?

There is no stress, as such, in French - more a question of pitch.
Rob Bannister
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