1 2  4 5 6 7 8 15
Murray Arnow filted:
(Let's ignore the fact that there are no independent butcher ... Norwegian-Americans in Seattle) is all but dead in most places.)

Balderdash!

Ditto...there are plenty of independent butcher stores here in sunny Arizona...it's just that the sign on the window is more likely to say "carniceria"..r
(Let's ignore the fact that there are no independent butcher ... Norwegian-Americans in Seattle) is all but dead in most places.)

Balderdash!

Ditto there's at least one of each within five minutes of my apartment here in Louisville.

Aaron Davies
Opinions expressed are solely those of a random number generator. Magnae clunes mihi placent, nec possum de hac re mentiri. Ho! Ha! Guard! Turn! Parry! Dodge! Spin! Thrust!
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Balderdash!

Ditto there's at least one of each within five minutes of my apartment here in Louisville.

Okay, all I know is that Coop goes to "Supercuts". As Orlando goes, so goes America, or so I thought.
On 24 Jun 2005, Areff wrote snip

So the fact that AmE uses the expression "the cleaners" ... for some reason. So why don't we say "the cleaner"?

Because that's reserved for the person who comes in to dust and vacuum your house?

No, that's "the cleaning lady" if it's one woman. I'm not sure what one says when it's a team of more than one cleaning lady, or if there's a man involved.
I have a feeling that fewer Brits are calling tomato ... might refer to as "genuine tomato sauce" in foreign cuisine.

Gotcha. That makes me wonder whether, 25 or 50 years ago (cf. Kojak Conjecture), something similar occurred in the US. ... for most Americans to serve spaghetti with either Heinz tomato ketchup (then called 'catsup' I believe) or Campbell's tomato soup.

Maybe that's true where you come from,are you from Kansas or someplace similar in Middle-America. Even my mother a good Irish-American made real tomato sauce.
It just goes to prove that you never order Italian south of Philly or West of Chicago.
Ketchup on pasta, eww yecch disgusting.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Gotcha. That makes me wonder whether, 25 or 50 years ... ketchup (then called 'catsup' I believe) or Campbell's tomato soup.

Maybe that's true where you come from,are you from Kansas or someplace similar in Middle-America. Even my mother a good Irish-American made real tomato sauce.

Har! I've had Irish-American Italian food (is there any other kind?) in the Boston region. Ketchup!
Wow! But in the actual emails the two people used the term "ketchup", unless CNN misreported this. Maybe CNN did a Peter H.M.S. Brooks?

You are correct. The subject line of the email was "Ketchup Trousers" but you must remember that these are "City" types.

Ray
Also consider the person at the dry cleaner's, who might have asked for clarification of what the substance was.

Interestingly, I think we in AmE would say "dry cleaners" rather than "dry cleaner's" we don't interpret it as ... "the butcher", "the barber" (even as names for the establishments as distinct from the professional who works at the establishment).

It's because in such expressions as "the butcher's" there is, in BrE, a tacit understanding that an unspoken word such as "shop" or "premises" follows. I thought we had done this one to death many times before.
So the fact that AmE uses the expression "the cleaners" indicates that we think of the cleaners as a plural, for some reason. So why don't we say "the cleaner"?

Because somebody aboard the Mayflower forgot to pack the bloody apostrophes.

Robin
Try out our live chat room.
Also consider the person at the dry cleaner's, who might have asked for clarification of what the substance was.

Interestingly, I think we in AmE would say "dry cleaners" rather than "dry cleaner's" we don't interpret it as ... indicates that we think of the cleaners as a plural, for some reason. So why don't we say "the cleaner"?

One reason may be that more than one person works there or maybe it's the cleaner's.
Show more