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Because in BrE "ketchup" means "tomato ketchup" by default.

That doesn't explain why "tomato sauce" wasn't used. We've been led to believe that "tomato sauce" is the usual BrE term for what Americans call "ketchup".

Led by whom? "Ketchup" has been at least as common as "tomato sauce" for decades. In the '70s the rightly notorious Wimpy bars certainly served "ketchup" (served in a handy tomato-shaped salmonella dispenser). And the two flagship Heinz products in the UK Beans and Ketchup are so well-known and assimilated into British popular culture that I was an adolescent before I discovered they were actually American.
Did the same source tell you we have Maize Flakes for breakfast too?

Ross Howard
Because in BrE "ketchup" means "tomato ketchup" by default.

That doesn't explain why "tomato sauce" wasn't used. We've been led to believe that "tomato sauce" is the usual BrE term for what Americans call "ketchup".

Some people may refer to it generically as "tomato sauce" but those who read labels would call ketchup "ketchup".
The report in "Times Online" refers to Ketchup:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1663196,00.html

'Ketchupgate' e-mail lawyer resigns
By Philippe Naughton, Times Online
The London lawyer who insisted that a secretary who spilt ketchup on his trousers should pay his £4 cleaning bill has resigned from his job.
...
But a spokeswoman denied that his resignation was precipitated by the "ketchupgate" row.
"Richard resigned in early June. He will leave us in September. He is working out his notice.
...
Mr Phillips, 36, is a senior associate with the company, the world’s fifth-biggest law firm, and is thought to be on a six-figure package. He sent the e-mail the day after Ms Anmer spilt some ketchup on his suit, unaware that Ms Anmer was attending her mother's funeral.

With the subject line "ketchup trousers", his e-mail read: "Hi Jenny, I went to a dry cleaners and they said it would cost £4 to remove ketchup stains. If you cd let me have the cash today, that wd be much appreciated."
Ms Amner replied: ...
She went on: "I apologise for accidentally getting a few splashes of ketchup on your trousers. Obviously your financial need as a senior associate is greater than mine as a mere secretary." ...

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.u.e)
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There's a scandal currently rocking the globe involving the London office of the law firm of Baker & McKenzie (which ... do the presumptively BrE speakers involved (the stainer and the stainee) refer to ketchup as "ketchup" rather than "tomato sauce"?

Because that's what we call it.
Adrian
Did the same source tell you we have Maize Flakes for breakfast too?

My experiences in Britain some years ago taught me that British breakfasters eat either (a) fried eggs, bacon, sausage, toast, grilled tomahto, waffles made out of potato, or some variation on that theme, or (b) "Muesli(x)", a postwar foodstuff apparently of Continental 5C European (specifically Alpine?) origin.
US reverse-colonialism. Only the most refined viz., or at ... a nuance, or are you having memory problems again, Richard?)

The nuance is that in BrE the condiment that Americans call "(tomato) ketchup" seems to be called "tomato sauce". If ... is that a conscious Americanism of the sort that the Omrud (Final Arbiter of British English Usage), say, finds alarming?

OK, I will pronounce. It is not and Americanism, conscious or otherwise. "ketchup" carries no overtone of US English. It's a perfectly normal UK term exciting no interest in the origin of the speaker. Some people call the stuff "tomato sauce", but I can't discern any inference one can draw from which of these two options is chosen, in relation to origin or indeed class (which is likely a more common differentiator).
OTOH, the stuff which comes in jars and which one might use on pasta, or which one makes in a saucepan from tomatoes, onions, garlic and herbs is never ketchup but always sauce.
Since you were kind enough to express interest in Daughter's trip to the land of the free, I can announce that she has now landed safely at JFK and made her way to New York for an overnight stay. She told me that the immigration officer looked at her papers, stamped her passport and said "Welcome to the USA". Perhaps he reads AUE.

David
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Since you were kind enough to express interest in Daughter's trip to the land of the free, I can announce ... the immigration officer looked at her papers, stamped her passport and said "Welcome to the USA". Perhaps he reads AUE.

Cool. Hope she enjoys Candlewood Lake when she heads oop north.
Also consider the person at the dry cleaner's, who might have asked for clarification of what the substance was.

Interestingly, I think we in AmE would say "dry cleaners" rather than "dry cleaner's" we don't interpret it as ... indicates that we think of the cleaners as a plural, for some reason. So why don't we say "the cleaner"?

It's the establishment belonging to the Dry Cleaner (or the Butcher, or the Baker). We are, after all, a nation of shopkeepers

David
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Because in BrE "ketchup" means "tomato ketchup" by default.

That doesn't explain why "tomato sauce" wasn't used. We've been led to believe that "tomato sauce" is the usual BrE term for what Americans call "ketchup".

Not by us, you haven't. Somebody's 'avin' a larf.

David
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OK, I will pronounce. It is not and Americanism, conscious or otherwise. "ketchup" carries no overtone of US English. It's ... of these two options is chosen, in relation to origin or indeed class (which is likely a more common differentiator).

For goodness sake, did I write that? It is in reality perfect, but entirely dense. Parse that!

David
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