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OK, I will pronounce. It is not and Americanism, conscious ... or indeed class (which is likely a more common differentiator).

For goodness sake, did I write that? It is in reality perfect, but entirely dense. Parse that!

Parse the ketchup? Here it is...
For me, 'tomato sauce' was the BrE norm for the bottled stuff decades ago (but others here seem to disagree: I can only speak for my own experience), but 'ketchup' has slowly taken over without being seen as a particular American copying. It's a fair suggestion that differentiation from a cook's tomato sauce is part of the reason, but it's unlikely to be the whole reason, if only because cooking is a dying art. I don't suppose the current BrE second syllable stress on kilometre and harass has arrived as a conscious copying from elsewhere either. Words change.

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
Maybe that's true where you come from,are you from Kansas or someplace similar in Middle-America. Even my mother a good Irish-American madereal tomato sauce.

Har! I've had Irish-American Italian food (is there any other kind?) in the Boston region. Ketchup!

We have lots of Italian-Americans in Boston, the North End, East Boston and Readville are all Italian neighborhoods and my town{Dedham} which is next to Readville is over run with them.
Anybody here who put Ketchup on pasta around here would get hung, drawn and quartered. Actually real Italians-Americans call it gravy not sauce.
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"Robin Bignall" > >
Because somebody aboard the Mayflower forgot to pack the bloody Robin

Be careful what you say about apostrophes buddy.
"Robin Bignall" > >

Because somebody aboard the Mayflower forgot to pack the bloody Robin

Be careful what you say about apostrophes buddy.

Are you feeling possessive about them, Ray?

Robin
We have lots of Italian-Americans in Boston, the North End,

Isn't the North End now a yuppie neighborhood?
East Boston

I thought East Boston was demolished when they built Logan Airport.
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"Robin Bignall" > > Be careful what you say about apostrophes buddy.

Are you feeling possessive about them, Ray? Robin

You should see me when they leave it out when spelling my name.
the Omrud filted:
Since you were kind enough to express interest in Daughter's trip to the land of the free, I can announce ... the immigration officer looked at her papers, stamped her passport and said "Welcome to the USA". Perhaps he reads AUE.

Nah...if if he did, he would have said "Welcome to Leftpondia"..r
Did the same source tell you we have Maize Flakes for breakfast too?

My experiences in Britain some years ago taught me that British breakfasters eat either (a) fried eggs, bacon, sausage, toast, ... or some variation on that theme, or (b) "Muesli(x)", a postwar foodstuff apparently of Continental 5C European (specifically Alpine?) origin.

They will never sell anything named Mueslix as food in the U.S.A, a more unappetizing name can't be found. Plus the ad campaign made the mistake of saying it's what Euros eat saying anything is big in Europe will kill it here{remember Slim Whitman?}.
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OK, I will pronounce.

I shall pronounce that to be a dodgy sort of usage. Even in the Manc conurbation.
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