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OK, I will pronounce. It is not and Americanism, conscious or otherwise. "ketchup" carries no overtone of US English. It's ... of these two options is chosen, in relation to origin or indeed class (which is likely a more common differentiator).

My ancient COD, c1964, agrees. Not an Americanism, but probably derived from Chinese, it says.
Also gives "catsup" as a variant of "ketchup:, but nary a word about US origin.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
I don't suppose the current BrE second syllable stress on kilometre and harass has arrived as a conscious copying from elsewhere either. Words change.

Interesting - both versions are common here.
I say HARass and KILometre. The latter because that is what I was taught at school, when it was a foreign measurement anyway.
But when we went metric and the word entered common speech, a lot of people said "kilOmetre" (though they didn't say "millImetre"). Perhaps it was by analogy with "speedometer".
Everyone I heard pronounced "harass" with the stress on the first syllable until we got TV in 1975, and a few years later there was a cops and robbers series called "Cagney and Lacey", where the protagonists pronounced it with stress on the second syllable. I think that was about 1983-1985.

So I have a Cagney thesis to match Areff's Fonzie thesis that the "harASS" pronunciation spread through the TV series.
The other day I was listening to a radio news broadcast where a white English-speaking reporter was intervieing a black representative of a taxi-owners' association about a proposed strike, on the grounds that the police were harassing taxi drivers. The reporter consistently used "harASS" and "harASSment" (the Cagney pronunciation) while the taxi bloke (for whom English was presumably a second language) consistently said "HARass".

I suspect that may have been because he did not come from an affluent background, and his family did not have TV at the time that the Cagney and Lacey series was broadcast.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Did the same source tell you we have Maize Flakes for breakfast too?

My experiences in Britain some years ago taught me that British breakfasters eat either (a) fried eggs, bacon, sausage, toast, ... or some variation on that theme, or (b) "Muesli(x)", a postwar foodstuff apparently of Continental 5C European (specifically Alpine?) origin.

Last month, driving down a Welsh mountainside, my wife and I simultaneously remarked "I'm feeling peckish".
We rounded the next bend and, as if by magic, there was a little food cart, with "Snax" on the side.
So we stopped for breakfast, and the next customer who came asked for "Best and mushrooms".
Neither we nor the pie cart lady understood what he was talking about, so he explained, "Best - ******* - Bacon, Eggs, Sausage, Tomato".

How common is that in BrE?
Whatever it is, we've adopted it, and will be having best for breakfast shortly.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
That doesn't explain why "tomato sauce" wasn't used. We've been led to believe that "tomato sauce" is the usual BrE term for what Americans call "ketchup".

Perhaps that's another misle.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Afterwards, I added the paste to the pork barbecue preparation I made yesterday, if anyone is curious.

You don't have to be curious to post here, but it helps.

Matti
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I don't suppose the current BrE second syllable stress on kilometre and harass has arrived as a conscious copying from elsewhere either. Words change.

Interesting - both versions are common here.
I say HARass and KILometre. The latter because that is what I was taught at school, when it was a foreign measurement anyway.
But when we went metric and the word entered common speech, a lot of people said "kilOmetre" (though they didn't say "millImetre"). Perhaps it was by analogy with "speedometer".
Everyone I heard pronounced "harass" with the stress on the first syllable until we got TV in 1975, and a few years later there was a cops and robbers series called "Cagney and Lacey", where the protagonists pronounced it with stress on the second syllable. I think that was about 1983-1985.

So I have a Cagney thesis to match Areff's Fonzie thesis that the "harASS" pronunciation spread through the TV series.
The other day I was listening to a radio news broadcast where a white English-speaking reporter was intervieing a black representative of a taxi-owners' association about a proposed strike, on the grounds that the police were harassing taxi drivers. The reporter consistently used "harASS" and "harASSment" (the Cagney pronunciation) while the taxi bloke (for whom English was presumably a second language) consistently said "HARass".

I suspect that may have been because he did not come from an affluent background, and his family did not have TV at the time that the Cagney and Lacey series was broadcast.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Did the same source tell you we have Maize Flakes for breakfast too?

My experiences in Britain some years ago taught me that British breakfasters eat either (a) fried eggs, bacon, sausage, toast, ... or some variation on that theme, or (b) "Muesli(x)", a postwar foodstuff apparently of Continental 5C European (specifically Alpine?) origin.

Last month, driving down a Welsh mountainside, my wife and I simultaneously remarked "I'm feeling peckish".
We rounded the next bend and, as if by magic, there was a little food cart, with "Snax" on the side.
So we stopped for breakfast, and the next customer who came asked for "Best and mushrooms".
Neither we nor the pie cart lady understood what he was talking about, so he explained, "Best - ******* - Bacon, Eggs, Sausage, Tomato".

How common is that in BrE?
Whatever it is, we've adopted it, and will be having best for breakfast shortly.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
That doesn't explain why "tomato sauce" wasn't used. We've been led to believe that "tomato sauce" is the usual BrE term for what Americans call "ketchup".

Perhaps that's another misle.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
So we stopped for breakfast, and the next customer who came asked for "Best and mushrooms". Neither we nor ... was talking about, so he explained, "Best - ******* - Bacon, Eggs, Sausage, Tomato". How common is that in BrE?

These days it tends to be BESST.
Bloody spam.
Matti
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