In a volume of Collected writings of J.M. Keynes ("Activities 1931-1939") are reported the "notes for a speech to the Political Economy Club, 11 November 1931". At some point, Keynes writes (p. 12)

"Ripe pear falling off the tree
Would have been sleepy in ten minutes
Like the bear which was 'just right'"
Does someone know if these lines come from a poem, a novel, etc. and from whom (poets, etc.)
Thanks in advance.
In a volume of Collected writings of J.M. Keynes ("Activities 1931-1939") are reported the "notes for a speech to the ... someone know if these lines come from a poem, a novel, etc. and from whom (poets, etc.) Thanks in advance.

These lines may not be from any other work.
It seems possible that Keynes was comparing the sleepiness (1) of a recently fallen ripe pear with the just-rightness of the Baby Bear's porridge in the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears (2).
(1) Sleepy is a term used to describe a pear that has started softening in the process of decaying. If it is too sleepy it is uneatable. A pear that has softened only slightly will be just right to eat.

(2) http://www.dltk-kids.com/rhymes/goldilocks story.htm

Peter Duncanson
UK
(posting from u.c.l.e)
Hi Peter!
Yours seems a very good guess. Thanks. The context is the exit of the UK from the Gold standard at the beginning of the *** century. Keynes seems to argue that they choose the right time to make the move.
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Hi Peter! Yours seems a very good guess. Thanks. The context is the exit of the UK from the Gold standard at the beginning of the *** century. Keynes seems to argue that they choose the right time to make the move.

Thank you. I had been wondering about the context.

Peter Duncanson
UK
(posting from u.c.l.e)