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Hi

It's a line which is stated in the thread title.

My question is how "kinda" works in that line? I can provide more context in case it's necessary. Thanks in advance.

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"Kinda puts ..." = "It kind of puts ..."

Does that explain it?

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Mina Uzun"kinda"

I'd translate it as "more or less" or "approximately".

Kinda puts that whole pillow thing in perspective. ~
It puts the whole incident with the pillow(s) more or less in perspective.

We're kind of a thing now. ~
We're more or less a thing now.

It kinda looks like an old potato. ~
It looks [approximately / more or less] like an old potato.


I kinda gotta clean up now.
(This one seems different to me. Even though the words say I've more or less got to clean up now, it sounds more like an attempt to terminate the conversation with a very weak excuse.)

CJ

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GPY

"Kinda puts ..." = "It kind of puts ..."

Does that explain it?


Well I have some trouble with the use of 'kinda/kind of". I mean as far as I am concerned, "fairly, quite, slightly, somewhat, a little etc." are the synonyms of it and it's also used to soften the impact in some cases. And I can't figure out exact meaning whenever I come across with this phrase. That's why I need clarification. Could you please help me with that? Thanks in advance.

As in "I kinda gotta clean up now" or "we're kind of a thing now" or "it kinda looks like an old potato". These are all the lines from the same show. What would you suggest me to comprehend the usage of this phrase? Thanks in advance.
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Mina UzunI mean as far as I am concerned, "fairly, quite, slightly, somewhat, a little etc." are the synonyms of it and it's also used to soften the impact in some cases.

Right. It can soften a statement or express the speaker's hesitation or uncertainty. However, often in colloquial speech it acts as little more than a filler or lubricant, having no very important meaning.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
GPY
Mina UzunI mean as far as I am concerned, "fairly, quite, slightly, somewhat, a little etc." are the synonyms of it and it's also used to soften the impact in some cases.

Right. It can soften a statement or express the speaker's hesitation or uncertainty. However, often in colloquial speech it acts as little more than a filler or lubricant, having no very important meaning.


Well, what about this dialogue?

Joey: Chandler give me that. (starts chasing him into the kitchen)

Chandler: No no, you’ve got your options. You can smoke it like this (demonstrates).

Joey: Chandler!

Chandler: Or you can hold it in your mouth and smoke it like this (demonstrates).

Joey: Chandler, give me the cigarette. Give me it, give me it!

Chandler: (gives Joey the cigarette) All right you try.

Joey: Thank you. Ok, how’s this? (takes another drag).

Chandler: That’s not bad. All right, now when you’re finished it’s really cool if you flick it. You kinda flick it. You flick it. (Joey does do) That’s good. Now you keep practicing and uh-I’ll go put out the sofa.

How "kinda" works in the last line?

Thanks in advance.

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Mina UzunYou kinda flick it.

This "kinda" can suggest the speaker's doubt/hesitation about whether "flick" is exactly the correct word or describes exactly correctly what should be done. However, in the context, the word "flick" does seem to describe the action correctly, as far as I can tell, so this "kinda" may be little more than a filler word. It is common for some people to frequently say "kinda" and "sorta" without any real need.

Much obliged for the answers.