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Dear Teachers,

Is it ok if I write like this ?:

a/The employment agencies concerned abroad are respectfully requested to provide favorable conditions for Mr Smith to get a job suited to his qualifications and capacity so that he can get stable income.

b/The employment agencies concerned abroad are respectfully requested to assign Mr Smith a jo suited to his qualifications and capacityso that he can get stable income .

Thank you in advance
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Comments  
Neither is correct. It is hard to tell what you are trying to say, so this is my suggestion:

Employment agencies with overseas contacts are asked to assist Mr Smith to find a well-paid job suited to his qualifications and capacity.
Thank you Feebs,but I am afraid "Employment agencies with overseas contacts are asked to assist..." doesn't sound polite and it is not formal .This sentence is in a letter written by an agency.It should be formal.I mean that this letter is sent to any overseas employment agency it may concern .

Can I say :" Overseas employment agencies are kindly/respectfully requested to assist Mr Smith in finding a well-paid job suited to his qualifications and capacity."

Best Wishes
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It would be perfectly polite and formal in the UK, and more acceptable than "kindly/respectfully requested", which is a distinctly old-fashioned turn of phrase.
Thank you . I understand now , but how about if I write " Overseas employment agencies are requested to assist Mr Smith in finding a well-paid job suited to his qualifications and capacity."?

Best wishes
Tuongvan, that's fine. I can see you are seeking a more deferential approach. I also think you have too many words. If the job is suited to his qualifications (and he is highly qualified), it will be well-paying. There's no advantage to saying "his qualifications and his capacity" - just stick with qualifications.

So what about these?

Any assistance the overseas employment agencies can provide to Mr. Smith in helping him secure a position suited to his qualifications would be greatly appreciated.

It would be greatly appreciated if the overseas employment agencies could assist Mr. Smith in securing a position suited to his qualifications.
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Dear Grammar Geek,

The two sentences you give are very excellent .They are just the ways of writing I'm looking for .Though I , a non-native speaker, cannot express the ideas in a good way , I can sense this or that sentence is fine or not fine .Sometimes I write a sentence that I know for sure it is not fine to a native speaker's ears. Thanks to this forum I learn the way to correct it from native speakers . Once again thank you very much for taking the trouble to help me find a way of writing I like best.

Best wishes
Hi Tuongvan,

Here's a cultural comment, not related to grammar.

You are asking employment agencies overseas to help Mr. Smith to find a good job. Do you realize that they are businesses, which will be happy to do this if he (or you, or someone) is willing to pay them money?

Would you write to a shoe store and say 'Please help Mr. Smith to find a pair of shoes'?

Best wishes, Clive
I must admit I was a bit puzzled by the point of this letter. Mr Smith can register with any agency when he gets abroad - he doesn't need some sort of reference from an agency in his home country. As Clive said, finding job for people is the whole function of these businesses, so it seems a bit pointless just asking them to do their job. Rather like writing to PepsiCo and saying 'please make Coke for people to buy'.
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