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Are these correct?

1. I know a teacher that biked back and forth to school in grade 7. (With 'grade 7' in here, do I need to shift 'know' to 'knew' ?)

2. I knew a teacher that biked back and forth to school in grade 7.

3. In grade 7, I knew a teacher that biked back and forth to school.

4. In grade 7, I know a teacher that biked back and forth to school. (Even thought I know this teacher, I'm talking about the past so I need to use 'knew' right?)

Thanks
Comments  
3. (When I was) In grade 7, I knew a teacher that biked back and forth to school.
I think this is the only correct one.

1 and 2 may be understood as meaning that he didn't bike to school all the time, but only during grade 7 (and whose grade 7?).

4 is confusing.
1. is confusing. When I read your sentence, I understand it as "I know (now) a teacher who biked etc... when he was in grade 7.

Is that what you mean? Or is it more like "I know a teacher who biked ... when I was in grade 7" Or "... when he taught in grade 7"??

2. / 3. As Marcus says, who was/is in grade 7? Emotion: tongue tied

My proposition:

When I was/back in grade 7, I used to know a teacher who biked back and forth to school".
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As a side note, Pieanne corrected this, but we use "who" for people - a teacher WHO biked.
It's better to use "who" for people - when the relative pronoun is a subject - isn't it? "That" is OK for people when it's a complement, and then you can drop it. (I'm talking about defining relative clauses)
Ugh. I always get in trouble when people start using terms like "defining relative clause" because I'm not very good at the proper names of things.

Do you mean things like "My daughter, who is in first grade, is very cute" versus "My daughter that is in first grade is very cute" to differentiate her my other daughter (who, uh, must look like a troll)?
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Yes!

Exactly... (I learnt most of these terms on this forum...)
With me, the "who/that" for people thing is probably one of those "rules" that you never should have learned, because they're wrong sometimes. I just try NOT to use "that" for people if "who" works just as well.

You are probably correct that when you need to use a restrictive clause (in this case to tell my first-grade daughter from my third-grade daughter), that "that" is a better choice. Using "that" say "Hey, eveyone, I'm using this to give you information you need to know which daughter I'm talking about here!" I would use the presence or absence of commas to show whether it was restrictive information or simply additional information, rather than using "that."

However, I'm certain there are other native speakers don't worry about using "that" for a person, so like I said, it's probably just a silly thing that I learned and can't seem to let go of.
<I just try NOT to use "that" for people if "who" works just as well. >

So do I Emotion: smile
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