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Hi. I think the phrase "as well as" is a prepositional phrase. What I am having difficulty is knowing when to place a comma before such a prepositional phrase (I think it is a prepositional phrase - not sure, though) and when not. With my limited knowledge in this area of grammar (I think we are talking about grammar - not sure, though), I think the correctness of placing a comma before such a prepositional phrase would be heavily (predominantly?) dependent upon whether it is linked contextually to the rest of the sentences or to the text as a whole, or not. I think the fictitious scenario I introduced below in the format of one person talking would fit one that is linked contextually, thus creating a need to have a comma before the phrase containing the phrase "as well as." Please note that the writing below only makes note of one person's talking part in the context of having a conversation with one other person or having several conversations with some other people.

(fictitious scenario - one person talking)

Wow, guys. That was a great meal, wasn't it. Anyway, I want to know who did all the preparation for today's event? Really? Was it John? Are you saying that he was the person who sent out the invitations as well as preparing all the meals? Wow. I think I should go see him and thank him in person.

I think no comma should be placed before the underlined part with what I think is the prepositional phrase "as well as" since the part is linked contextually to the rest of the sentences.
Comments  
Short answer: no comma. "As well as" is being used as a conjunction, similiar to "and." The sentence could be reworded to replace the "as well as" phrase without changing the sense. For example:
"John sent out the invitations and prepared all the meals."
Technically "preparing" should be replaced with "prepared". If you do not have a subject on both sides of the conjunction, the verbs should match tense. You would not say "He sent out invitations and preparing meals". You would say "He sent out invitations and prepared meals". Alternatively, if he has not completed the meal preparation, you could say "He sent out invitations and he is preparing meals".
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BradPTechnically "preparing" should be replaced with "prepared"

I agree. When thinking in terms of grammar, it seems wrong, and even when I read the sentence, it sounds wrong.
Thank you.

I wrote this sentence in my fictitious scenario writing:

Are you saying that he was the person who sent out the invitations as well as preparing all the meals?

I think we can write (to correct it):

Are you saying that he was the person who sent out the invitations as well as having preparing all the meals?

But I feel the following sentence with the verb "prepared" in the subordinate clause is awkward. What do you think?

Are you saying that he was the person who sent out the invitations as well as prepared all the meals?

I feel to modify the awkward sentence, we have to write (replacing the phrase "as well as" with the conjunction and adverb "and also" - I think the word "also" is an adverb):

Are you saying that he was the person who sent out the invitations and also prepared all the meals?
The last sentence works, but if you want to keep the "as well as" format, say:

Are you saying that he was the person sending out the invitations as well as preparing all the meals?
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Thank you, Doctor D.

I made a mistake (typo?). I meant to write the word "preparing" in the underlined part instead of the word "prepared."

Thus, it should be this.

Are you saying that he was the person who sent out the invitations as well as having prepared all the meals.

I wrote:

I think we can write (to correct it):

Are you saying that he was the person who sent out the invitations as well as having preparing all the meals?
Just checking in after a little vacation. You want to use parallel forms. (Also, there is no "having preparing." If you are using that verb form, you want to say "having prepared.")

If it is not too late, here is one more way to say this:
Are you saying that he was the person sending out the invitations as well as preparing all the meals?
Hi Doctor D,

I'd like to send this
Is there a mistake?
Have you thought about you both being students at the same time? You would have to live off of financial aid initially- hopefully he could get a teaching appointment that will decrease the amounts. A PhD program would give much more flexibility than trying to do a masters + work full time.
This may seem like a scary option, and may not be for everyone- but I think it is worth considering, especially since you are looking at its being short term.


Thank you Doctor D
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