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It had come to be known as the Hathras case.

It came to be known as the Hathras case.

It was known as the Hathras case.


Have all of the sentences same meaning?

How should I use "come to be known" ?

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WaridHave all of the sentences same meaning?

They have the same general lexical meaning, but the meaning differs according to tense, as you probably know already.

The meaning difference by tense is the same as you would have for any verbs in English. You have in your examples the past perfect and the past simple of 'to come to be known' and the past simple of 'to be known', respectively.


The idiom 'to come to {verb}' is not often used, and not with many verbs, but it has the value of 'eventually end up'.

Our housekeeper falsified those documents and came to admit it nine years later. (and eventually ended up admitting it)
The prolific Harvard historian explains how the West came to dominate the globe. (how the West, in the course of time, ended up dominating)
The Plymouth came to rest facing the wrong way in the westbound number one lane. (eventually landed facing)

WaridHow should I use "come to be known"?

You've already used it twice above. That's how you use it.

See https://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=%22come+to+be+known%22&l=0

CJ

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Warid
Have all of the sentences same meaning?

No, because of the verb.

Warid
How should I use "come to be known" ?

You have used it right. Interesting. It can't be used in the present tense.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

I didn't get it entirely. But thank you.

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