David Koepp is best known as one of Hollywood¹s highest paid screenwriters (and one of Spielberg¹s scribes). His screenwriting credits include everything from Toy Soldiers, Jurassic Park, and Carlito¹s Way, to Panic Room, Spider-Man, War of the Worlds and Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.
For the last decade he¹s been trying to make the transition into feature film directing. He made his debut with the promising Stir of Echoes, but has since followed up with some lackluster efforts, the 2004 Stephen King adaptation Secret Window and the 2008 Ricky Gervais supernatural romantic comedy Ghost Town. Honestly, I think Koepp is a much better screenwriter than he is a filmmaker, and that¹s not saying much considering the abundance of lackluster screenplays he¹s been involved with in the last 10-12 years. With that kind of intro, you must be really interested in his next directorial effort (yes, that was sarcasm).

Next up, Koepp will direct a film called Premium Rush, penned by his frequent screenwriting collaborator John Kamps. Aside from working with Koepp on Ghost Town and Zathura, he also wrote Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie. Yup, no snarky commentary needed.

According to Variety, the story follows a 20-something-year-old bike messenger who somehow gets involved in a chase across New York City. And we¹re not just talking about a little chase but big budget William Friedkin-style action sequences. Apparently a dirty cop is ³desperate to get his hands² on an envelope the messenger received from Columbia University (the Macguffin?).
As much as I¹m not a fan of Koepp¹s filmmaking choices thus far, I¹m always game for another chase movie, especially a film with a budget. Columbia Pictures is apparently fast tracking the project, and casting will begin searching for a leading man immediately. So I¹m sure we¹ll be hearing a casting and start announcement by year¹s end.

"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
According to Variety, the story follows a 20-something-year-old bike messenger who somehow gets involved in a chase across New York ... a dirty cop is ³desperate to get his hands² on an envelope the messenger received from Columbia University (the Macguffin?).

As a kid, I had always wanted a bike chase sequence, but it seemed you would need to create a claustrophobic effect to pull it off. Home camcorders shoot too wide, close calls with cars too dangerous to try. But get some tight alleys, weave through city traffic, pedestrians, cardboard boxes, some contact with the bike frame, and you've got something. Close calls on a bike are scarier than cars there's nothing protecting your flesh.
David Koepp is best known as one of Hollywood¹s highest paid screenwriters (and one of Spielberg¹s scribes). His screenwriting credits ... Koepp on Ghost Town and Zathura, he also wrote Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie. Yup, no snarky commentary needed.

As someone who, once upon a time, wrote for Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: the TV series, I say go ahead - make some snarky comments.

Beyond that, though, I'm on record here as having enjoyed Ghost Town - not earth-shattering or anything, but nice enough, and Stir of Echoes was flat-out great. Didn't see Secret Window (not much of a King fan) but it didn't look like much of a story or a film.
According to Variety, the story follows a 20-something-year-old bike messenger who somehow gets involved in a chase across New York ... a dirty cop is ³desperate to get his hands² on an envelope the messenger received from Columbia University (the Macguffin?).


As much as I¹m not a fan of Koepp¹s filmmaking choices thus far, I¹m always game for another chase movie, ... searching for a leading man immediately. So I¹m sure we¹ll be hearing a casting and start announcement by year¹s end.

See, to me, a chase isn't a movie. It's a scene, sure. A setpiece, even. But if the 'story' you're starting with is 'a guy on a bike is being chased across NYC by a guy or guys in motor vehicles' then you haven't really piqued my interest.

Life Continues, Despite
Evidence to the Contrary
Steven
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
As a kid, I had always wanted a bike chase sequence, but it seemed you would need to create a ... bike frame, and you've got something. Close calls on a bike are scarier than cars there's nothing protecting your flesh.

On a show - ages ago - we hired a 'bicycle guy' who has a tricked-out mountain bike, with camera mounting plates front, back, and sides He was able to get a lot of POV stuff quite quickly and easily, and it looked really good. You don't have to get going all that fast, if the camera's that close to the ground, to get the effect you need. So long as everything's controlled, you can do a lot scarier-looking stuff on a bike, especially for little or no money, than you can with a car. Put the car between the camera and the bike and you can strap a mattress to the side, and stage a full-on collision, with the bike hitting the car pretty hard. It's fairly do-able.

Life Continues, Despite
Evidence to the Contrary
Steven