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In Japan, many different dishes are prepared for New Year's. Each dish has a special meaning, such as good health, happiness and long life. Together, they are called osechi-ryori. During the New Year's celebration, they are stored in beautiful lacquer boxes, called jubako, until they are eaten.

"Lacquer boxes" is very foreign to me. I've googled for its photoes, but they're still bizzare to me. So, do you use that kind of boxes often? When are the occasions? And what is special about them? Thanks.
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They should not seem so bizarre-- they are simply square or rectangular wooden dishes/bowls with a thick finish (several coatings of lacquer). For osechiryori, which is composed of many different dishes, they are designed to stack. Real lacquer bowls are now quite expensive, and most people make do with plastic imitations (probably made in China). They are too much trouble for regular home meals (plain old round china is easy to clean), but are used for banquet lunches, etc.
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Thanks, Mister.

Got it!

Since you're in Japan now, you must be very familiar with them. Are they used at New Year's Time as a rule or every day?
You'll get them in more traditional restaurants every day-- but they'll be the plastic ones.
Mister MicawberYou'll get them in more traditional restaurants every day-- but they'll be the plastic ones.

Thanks, Mister.
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