It is funny for me because when we teach/learn English it is both British and American. Together they make up English. And here suddenly you want to distinguish between American and British Culture.
I raised that issue due to the fact that you insisted on not asking questions about American writers. However, I am interested in what Malcolm wrote. Obviously, vocabulary is important. If I ask you about Stephen King's works, I guess, you are not going to answer, aren't you?

Pawel
Poland
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=20 It is funny for me because when we teach/learn English it is both =British=20 and American. Together they make up English. And here suddenly you want=to=20 distinguish between American and British Culture.

The English and American languages are completely different and only generally mutually understandable. Worse there are dialects of both still spoken, in limited areas, which use different vocabulary and grammar.
The tendency of foreigners to teach them as one language is irrelevant to the reality of the situation.
=20
Dave Fawthrop Sick of Premium SMS scams, SMS marketing, Direct marketing phone calls, Silent phone calls?=20 Register with http://www.tpsonline.org.uk/tps /
IME they work :-)
It is funny for me because when we teach/learn English it is both British and American. Together they make up English. And here suddenly you want to distinguish between American and British Culture.

No, the point is the uk part of the ng name. We can speak for English English, but any answers we give about the American (per)version of the language will necessarily not be ex-cathedra. Even Scots, Welsh and Irish versions will not necessarily be fully informed.
If I ask you about Stephen King's works, I guess, you are not going to answer, aren't you?

No. Not read any of them. Ask me about Arthur Quiller Couch and I might have something to say. We'll talk about Joyce and Shaw because we annexed them, and they didn't like Ireland much anyway.

Paul Burke
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At 08:40:19 on Wed, 7 Dec 2005, Paul Burke (Email Removed) wrote in (Email Removed):
If I ask you about Stephen King's works, I guess, you are not going to answer, aren't you?

No. Not read any of them.

You should try some of them - I rate him very highly indeed. Because of his subject matter, he gets tucked into a "genre" corner by many who haven't read him, but his handling of language, plot and characterisation are expert, and better than most "mainstream" novelists.
And the books are far from all being buckets-of-blood. Try "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon", for example. (Now there we do have a slight cultural clash, in that I had no idea who Tom Gordon was - but it becomes apparent right from the start that he's a baseball player, and the 8-year-old protagonist's hero.)

Molly Mockford
They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety - Benjamin Franklin (My Reply-To address *is* valid, though may not remain so for ever.)
It is funny for me because when we teach/learn English it is both British and American. Together they make up English. And here suddenly you want to distinguish between American and British Culture.

Well, our culture is important to us but is in danger of being swamped by American TV, films, music and fast food. That is why we are so keen to draw the distinction.

The language may be similar but the cultures are (forgive me) poles apart.
It is funny for me because when we teach/learn English it is both British and American. Together they make up English. And here suddenly you want to distinguish between American and British Culture.

Yes. The differences between USA varieties of the English language and British varieties are not huge, and speakers of the two varieties can generally converse in a normal fashion. However, the differences do exist, and they can occasionally cause confusion. This newsgroup you are posting to is called "uk.culture.language.english", and is thus used by people who are from the UK. People here are politely reminding you that we are not the best source of information on usages of the English language in the USA. We may also be no more familiar with the structures of the USA government and the culture and lifestyle of people in the USA than you are.
I raised that issue due to the fact that you insisted on not asking questions about American writers. However, I ... is important. If I ask you about Stephen King's works, I guess, you are not going to answer, aren't you?

If the question you are asking about Stephen King's work relates to some aspect of his usage of the English language which is common to British and American English, yes we could answer your questions. If, however, he is using slang terms which are particular to some subculture which exists only in the USA (this, of course, is more likely in the works of Malcolm X), people who use this newsgroup are quite likely to have no familiarity with those slang terms, and thus not to be able to answer your questions.

Matthew Huntbach
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
This newsgroup you are posting to is called "uk.culture.language.english", and is thus used by people who are from the UK.

That is true, but not strictly relevant to the point at issue. The important point is that this group is for discussion of the use (and misuse) of the English language in the UK. Being a uk.* group simply means that it offers a UK perspective on the subject matter.

John Briggs
It is funny for me because when we teach/learn English it is both British and American. Together they make up ... If I ask you about Stephen King's works, I guess, you are not going to answer, aren't you? Pawel Poland

There are Americans who post here. Feel free to ask questions about American writers. I didn't see your original questions about Malcolm X.

Ivan
It is funny for me because when we teach/learn English ... you are not going to answer, aren't you? Pawel Poland

There are Americans who post here. Feel free to ask questions about American writers. I didn't see your original questions about Malcolm X. Ivan

And I don't suppose I'm alone in wishing that they would keep their own culture to themselves.
Yours,
Dr Petri

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