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Hi

Are both correct:

1. I've been ill last days

2. I'm ill last days

cheers
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Hi

Neither is correct.

I have been ill for the last few days.
I have been ill these last few days.
Hi Newguest,

No, sorry.

I've been ill [for] the last few days. (I have been ill and I still am.)

I'm ill, and have been for the last few days. (Emphasizes that you are now ill, but it's being going on for a while.)

I was ill the last few days. (But you are better now.)

PS - Can you tell me about your avatar? What is that a picture of?
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Grammar GeekI've been ill [for] the last few days. (I have been ill and I still am.)
Does that necessarily mean you are still sick? I thought that wasn't necessarily true.
Short answer: Yes, but i'm not as likely to use it that way.

Opti is the faster typist - he posted 2 minutes before I did!

Maybe he'll give his opinion too, but if someone said "I've been sick" (remember in the US, we use "sick" for "ill" - it doesn't mean we've been vomiting up a storm) I would think they were still sick, but if they said "I was sick" I would assume they were better.

It's certainly possible that you could use present perfect for a completed action in this case (Sorry I didn't get back to you. I've been sick the last few days, but I'm better now.) That would be the "past event but connected to the present" in that it explains why I am NOW telling you why I didn't anwwer you sooner.

Maybe it's one of those cases where Americans do prefer simple past. At least, this American. Amy or CJ or any of the others can chime in too, and may well have a different opinion.

(We're always being told in ESL forums that we simply never use the present perfect and we always use the simple past, but in this case, I actually would be more likely to use past.)
Hi

So in what situation and with which tenses can I use the phrase "last days".

As for the avatar - I'm not really sure myself. I saw this avatar reading a Buddhist forum (one of the users had the same one. I liked it and copied it. Maybe it's the Buddha or someone similar. The figure has got the burning swastika on the forehead.
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Grammar GeekIt's certainly possible that you could use present perfect for a completed action in this case (Sorry I didn't get back to you. I've been sick the last few days, but I'm better now.) That would be the "past event but connected to the present" in that it explains why I am NOW telling you why I didn't anwwer you sooner.
Yeah, that's what I was thinking. Thanks Emotion: smile I'd have another thing to ask, but maybe I'll start a new thread, or I'd go off topic.

NewGuest, that avatar is scary though! LOL.
Anyway, I think that you can't just say "last days" because "the last few days" is just the idiomatic collocation to use in English.
I've seen her in the last few days, so I guess the aliens haven't seized her.
"Last days", on its own, to me sounds like the last period of someone's life, lol.
Hi

Last days – the end of a series (of days). He spent his last days smoking as many cigarettes as possible. The last days of autumn were exceptionally cold. He wants to/will spend the last days of the year in the . Here we could replace 'last' with 'final'


These last few days – the end of a period with a link to the present – last here meaning most recent (up to now). Here we could replace ‘last’ with ‘past

1. I've been ill last days - not possible to use 'last days' in this way.
We can't say - I've been ill final days.

2. I'm ill last days - not possible to use either the present simple or 'last days' in this way.
We can't say - I'm ill final days.

I have been ill these last few days.

The use of the present perfect is as a result of my perception of the time period – these last (few) days – which, for me, goes on up until and including today. I may or may not still be ill.

We also use 'sick' in the UK to mean 'ill'. People are off work on sick leave and get sick(ness)-benefit. I was sick all last week = I was ill all last week.

Thanks for your input!
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